Jason Strudwick Defencemen Camp – April 6th and 7th.

I have been working at Mt. Carmel school and helping out some youth hockey teams this year. I love the kids’ enthusiasm and work ethic. They always take a second to hear what I have to say and try to make the changes in their games.

If I am being honest, I don’t have a lot to offer in the department of scoring goals. Try as I might, when I played it just never came together for me in that area! We all have skills, scoring wasn’t mine.

I am very comfortable working with defencemen or forwards who want to work on the defensive side of the puck. This is an area that is very hard to coach. I know youth coaches are trying to develop this area of player’s games but it is hard. It literally can take years for young defencemen to acquire these skills.

After working with many young players this year I can see there are holes in most young D-men’s games. The biggest area of general weakness is the use of their sticks. So many players even in the NHL don’t take full advantage of them. In zone awareness, puck retrieval and first pass plays are also issues for defencemen from 8 to 35.

To help plug some of these holes foryoung players I have booked a camp for the weekend of April 6th and 7th. It is a two day camp, one hour of ice time each day that will work on three very specific areas of a defenceman’s game.

  • Stick-work
  • Shooting from the point
  • Puck movement

After playing so many years of hockey I realized that very focused and detailed work on one specific area at a time is the way to go. A shotgun approach sounds good on paper but nothing is really accomplished. This detailed approach is what all NHL players use. I will work with all camp participants in the same way.

I have ice times for Atom, Pee wee and Bantam players. This will be a very organized and detailed group of ice times. I expect all camp participants to come ready to work and be focused. The kids should expect me to use the ice time very efficiently and to help them improve as players.

If you have a child who is a forward that is struggling on the defensive side of the puck this camp will work for them as well. The same techniques used by defencemen in their own zone will translate well to a forward. Coaches will not give extra ice time to players that cannot play in both ends of the ice.

For more detail and for camp registration go to Jasonstrudwick.com. Please email all questions to info@jasonstrudwick.com

  • Minister D-

    Before having read Soup’s remark, my daily dyslexia read “Jason Strudwick Defenseman Camp – April 6 and 7” as
    “Jason Strudwick 6th and 7th Defenseman Camp.”

  • TKB2677

    Hey Struds.
    Does your camp help get Dmen to grow a set? There are a few current Oilers Dmen that could seriously use a few lessons.

    It’s men’s pro hockey not girls ringette. Not everyone has to be a crusher but it’s ok to lean on a few guys occasionally and not just stand there and take the abuse.

  • The Soup Fascist

    BTW. I am only half kidding about older players. I am guessing a camp specifically for D men who are entering Midget AAA, or Junior camps would have a line up, as to my knowledge there have not been a lot of opportunity for that level of instruction in this area – especially for such detailed parts of the skill set.

    Perry Pearn’s 3 on 3 evolved to include Jr and even pro attendees. Something like your instruction, mixed in with conditioning would, I think, draw scads of elite level defencemen in mid August. Likely already part of your development model, but definitely a niche in the market. Good Luck!

  • The Goalie 1976

    This is really nice to see Struds. Way to give back to the hockey community!

    With quite a few ex-NHLers in the area this is something we should see more of IMO.

    When Smyth retires I could see a similar camp focusing only on board work, and net presence.

    P.S. You could also have a 2 day camp for shoot-out skills after seeing that famous snipe on Kolzig.

  • ubermiguel

    “detailed work on one specific area at a time is the way to go”

    That is the absolute truth in any good training or skill acquisition program. Struds, is that the norm or the exception in NHL-level coaching?