THE PERFECT STORM

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It goes without saying that I am a big fan of the
Edmonton Oilers. I have every piece of Jordan Eberle gear ever made. I still
use the Oilers garbage can I was given as a birthday present when I was
12.  Even in these dark times on the ice
I’m still heavily invested in this ice hockey squadron and their continued
success.

And for all the problems we see on the ice and in the front
office there is a second massive problem on the horizon for the Oilers as 2015
begins. A problem that no one amount of winning – however
unlikely THAT is these days – will help.

And that is the very possible scenario of the Edmonton
economy falling off a cliff in the coming year.

Many of our fellow Oilers fans often rant in the comments
section here that we need to boycott the Oilers, avoid Rexall Place like it’s
ground zero for a zombie attack and die of preventable diseases by boycotting
Rexall Drugs. Sending a message to Daryl Katz’s gigantic wallet is the only
remaining hope for many Oilers fans who are well past the point of wanting to witness the 124nd rebuild in recent memory.

And the “hit em where it hurts” crew is already seeing some
impact. Reports that “4,000 to 5,000 seats were empty at a recent game” have
lit up the web, although the Oilers were quick to blame this on inclement
weather, not icing the worst team in the NHL for the past 15 years.

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Indeed the dubious streak of selling out Rexall Place has to
be one of the more hilarious outputs of the Edmonton Oilers Spin Factory –
anyone with a working set of eyes who has attended an Oilers game in the past couple of years can
tell you that the building isn’t full. 

Many folks are getting texts and calls on a frequent basis from people with tickets wanting to know if anyone wants them. That wasn’t happening a few years back. I am getting StubHub emails on the reg
suggesting that plenty of good tickets are available for upcoming games. That too is a new thing.

Last week I went to the ticket sales counter at Rexall Place just
prior to puck drop to ask if there were any available seats and the lady smiled
sadly and said “take your pick.” Further I swung by the Oilers store in
Kingsway on Christmas Eve to ask how the Mark Fayne #5 Jerseys on the rack were selling in
addition to the rest of the Oilers gear and the fellow told me “last Christmas was slow. This
one – way slower.”

The Oilers fans wanting to put a dent in team revenues: your
wish is coming true.

AND NOW FOR THE OTHER THING

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Anyone noticed the price of Oil lately? It was buzzing along
in the summer and then has since fallen off a cliff, down
approximately 50% from it’s high in July. Not good news in these parts as so goes the price of Oil – so goes the Alberta economy.

We can talk about whether or not the price of Oil will stay
in it’s current downward spiral or where it will possibly settle in the next 12
months. If I knew that answer I would be loading up on Oil futures and then
fanning myself with wads of cash surrounded by the entire Maxim Calendar of
models in 2013 on an island somewhere. No one saw this current crash coming and no one really knows what is going to happen next.

But a reasonable person can conclude that if the price of
Oil stays anywhere near it’s current price of $53.50 per barrel we will see a
significant pullback in the Oil patch. And once companies
in that industry start reducing their budgets and personnel counts we could see
the Alberta economy as a whole stall.

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Edmonton is in the classic late stages of an economic boom.
In sitting down with the boys over Christmas I asked them what they think of
the prospects of the economy if the price of Oil stays tanked. “Oh man, there is so much going on that isn’t Oil
related. All this construction downtown, #yeg hashtag use at an all time high.
Edmonton has long diversified past being dependent on Oil.” Then they lit cigars
with $100 bills and toasted their good fortune of low prices at the pump leading to
a cheaper commute to their jobs in the Oil patch.

It may be true that the Edmonton economy isn’t as
reliant on Oil as it has been in other recessionary cycles in the past. But we are still
heavily dependent on construction jobs and construction jobs come to an end
when a project is built. If there aren’t new projects to take their place those
construction jobs go away quick. And then companies one ring out start to get
affected and pull back too and so on and so forth.

Add in the heavy net migration of folks moving to Edmonton
to find work and you could see a situation where the unemployment rate spikes
as people with existing jobs are laid off and people moving to Edmonton find
their prospects a lot more dim than when they decided to pull up stakes and
head out west.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR THE OILERS?

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If Oilers fans are still doing well economically and they
decide to stop spending their hard earned dollars on the Edmonton Oilers that
is a significant problem for the team to be sure. But a solvable problem – turn
the team around, the fans will return, the Nuge will get a hat trick and we
will all storm down to the Oilers stores to buy Oilers branded oven mitts and the good
times will return.

Hit those very same Oilers fans in their wallets though with
a good ol’ fashioned bust cycle of the economy and the Oilers are suddenly
powerless to right the finances of the ship.

The point is this. The Oilers are moving into a much more
expensive building in the fall of 2016. Costs of operating the team will go up.
Oilers fans patience have worn out and we are already rightfully lowering
revenues on a nightly basis.

Now mix in a recession. 

When the thousands of small companies
that buy seasons tickets see a pullback in revenue and have to start cutting
non essential expenses “those stupid Oilers tickets no one at the office even
wants anymore” will be the first thing to go. Families facing job uncertainty
will undoubtedly tighten their belts too and “take the kids to watch the Oilers
get shelled” won’t rank very high on the strict new household budget.

The fanciest arena in the world and the best team ever would
see attendance fall in the economic scenario we are staring down. A team that
has tanked, tanked and tanked again, then refused to take responsibility for
anything and has alienated a good portion of it’s fanbase on the eve of moving
into an expensive new big arena and with a recession very possible? Yikes.

To those of you wishing economic collapse on the Oilers to
match their collapse on the ice – your dream may come true.

The perfect storm is now on the horizon.

  • D

    Saw the same thing happen in 2008 when I was living in LA. Our firm gave up its tickets to the Kings and Dodgers.

    My hope is for low Oil prices to be temporary. I don’t like seeing Alberta get hurt.

  • Burnward

    Difference between the two, is that the price of a barrel of oil is totally dependent on what the Saudis do and they have production like crazy on the other side of the world.

    Oilers are the masters of their own ship and they have shot holes in it themselves…no one to blame other than themselves for this. This would be comparable to an oil company who from the owner to management to the roughnecks lack desire, motivation, or inspiration, intelligence because they are already guaranteed millions no matter if they drill holes or sit around and talk about their hairdos. A pretty messed up system. Business would see them all out of work (concession, to trainers, to scouts, to players, management, etc) but the good ship oilers is being bankrolled by a billionaire who doesn’t care and fans who will keep flocking, no matter what.

    Kinda a sad day to be an Oilers fan (again)

  • tileguy

    the oiler players all appear to be out of shape and cannot keep up with the play. being a smaller club they all need to be alittle faster than the opposition if they are going to be atleast equal. skating drills need to be started immediately and they need to be of a very high energy in order to build some strength into most of the oiler players.the confidence will come back once the players start to believe that they can compete.hockey is a simple game if you are ahead of the play and you cannot compete if you are behind the play.start an extensive drills program and the players will start to win some games in two months

  • pkam

    Aren’t there still over 2000 in the waiting list of season tickets?

    Are the current season ticket holders really willing to give up their tickets knowing that they have to line up in the waiting list again?

    Nobody knows whether the Oilers will get McDavid and Babcock, but will you risk your season ticket now that the Oilers may start the 2015 season with McDavid on the bench and Babcock behind the bench?

    I am not a season ticket holder, but if I was, I will at least hold on for one more year, but definitely not a penny in jersey or souvenir.

    • I don’t believe for a moment that waiting list means anything. I believe there are people that signed their name to something that put them on the list but if the Oilers Ticket sales folks were to call on it right now they would get more Nos than Yesses for people on that list forking over their cash.

      • Spydyr

        I think there are enough people on the waiting list who have been there for a number of years who would absolutely say yes if they got called. It doesn’t mean they’ll keep the tickets forever, or that they won’t regret it in the long run, but they’d say yes.

        Probably.

        • I disagree, I am currently own season tickets and I am also approx #400 on the waiting list for more tickets.

          The thing you have to remember is you DO NOT lose your spot on the waiting list if you turn down tickets. I have had the opportunity to purchase more tickets 3 years running now and have said NO all 3 times.

          Your point sounds like it is based on the assumption that if you turn down tickets then you go to the back of the waiting list line again, which is not the case.

      • pkam

        I know I’ll get a lot of trashes, but if I get a call now I’ll pick up the season ticket without hesitation.

        The rebuild has gone on for 5 years. If the team does not turn it around in the next 2 years, I believe it will start a new rebuild. So it is the best time to gamble that the team will turn it around in the very near future. If it doesn’t, then I’ll give up my season ticket after the 2016-17 season.

        The coming year is the last year in Rexall and the following year is the 1st year in Rogers. It will be special moment in the Oilers history.

        And who knows, perhaps there will be bold moves in the organization at the end of the season?

        And we may add McDavid and Babcock next season.

        If the Oilers aren’t this bad, how much longer will I have to wait? If the Oilers become good again, will I get this opportunity again. Like I say, if it doesn’t work out, I will give up my ticket in 2 years and start to line up again. But I’ll not give up this opportunity to secure a season ticket after such a long wait.

      • Kr55

        On HF boards last summer there was a thread with people sharing their waiting list # for people new to the waiting list, and others were telling their existing # if they were offered tickets from the Oilers. When all the numbers were compared, the numbers for new people and existing that were offered ended up being very close together.

        Definitely seems like a possibility that they hit the end of the list this summer before selling all the season tickets that people walk away from unless there are drastic changes to get the confidence of the fan base back.

  • pkam

    Let’s contrast recent news in another sport where winning is important.

    NFL football
    New York Jets miss playoffs 4 consecutive seasons. News today, GM and coach fired

    Chicago Bears miss playoffs 3 seasons, coach with team 2 seasons . Both GM and coach fired.

    Atlanta Falcons coach fired after two season record of 10-22.

    Contrast that to oilers.

    Where is the emphasis on winning?

    • pkam

      AND FURTHERMORE

      Jim Harbaugh coached the 49ers for four years. First three years made the NFC championship game, made it to the Super Bowl once. This year they finished 8-8. He was fired this morning.

      There are about 120 teams in the four major NA professional sports leagues: NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL. NOWHERE ELSE would you find the same small group of people FAILING FLAGRANTLY for NINE YEARS without a major house-cleaning. It’s an absolute joke.

        • Burnward

          i beg to differ,u want to look at a franchise thats failed spectacularly for a decade plus?look at the Chicago Bears rick,never have i seen such a clusterf-ck of stupidity run by someone who by all means should be in the ground by now (Virginia McCaskey,George Halas’s daughter,also 91 years old) and her 2 idiot sons who just sit back in thier offices and collect the season ticket and luxury box revenues while watching Soldiers Field and that garbage for a playing surface collapse around them,and do dick-all about the quality of the team ON that field unless they have a spectacular collapse like they did this season

  • BlazingSaitls

    Why, it’s almost like it was foolish for Albertans to put their entire economic futures in the hands of a non-national resource management entity and pretend that hints would never change. (Although I suppose the National Energy Policy would have boned us long before now – at least OPEC will eventually sort itself out.)

    There’s more to the economic impact than just on the team though: every Monday night I go to Hudson’s on Whyte around 5:30 for dinner and drinks with a friend before we head to a choir rehearsal. We don’t usually leave until 7:15. Any of the nights the Oilers have been playing, I’ve never seen more than a handful of other people in there, when even a couple years ago the place would be at least half full on a game day.

    The Oilers are no longer a viable entertainment option for many people, and it’s starting to show in the choices that people are making when it comes to watching hockey. Who wants to spend money to see your team get scored on 3 times in 2 minutes when you could do the same thing at home for cheaper AND you don’t need to have pants on? It’s not a hard call.

  • Salty

    I wouldn’t worry too much about the low oil prices; most (edit: actually I don’t think any of them can, although I might be wrong about Saudi Arabia) OPEC members can’t sustain their national budgets at current prices although I’m sure this game of chicken will last a bit longer. I doubt it goes back up as high as it was though, so don’t expect the boom times to continue forever.

    Also, Albertans who think this province has a truly diversified economy amuse me to no end. Calgary would be on the fast-track to being the next Detroit if oil prices didn’t rebound for some bizarre reason.

    Oh, right, hockey. Booo Oilers, no honour for Connor, booo.

    • Devolution

      About the oil price, correct observation, incorrect conclusion. Countries like Venezuela and Nigeria need over $100/bbl to balance their budget at current production rates. Since they aren’t getting $100/bbl any more but still need the money, they increase production to make up the shortfall. This floods the market even more and lowers the price. Vicious circle.

      Also, China. For every 1% decrease in China’s GDP there is $10 reduction in the oil price because of reduced demand due to lower activity, and China is struggling.

      While it is true it will sort itself out, it may not be for a while.

      • Salty

        Interesting, I wasn’t aware Venezuela were increasing production. I thought they were pushing their production capacity as far as they could already, as they actually require the price of oil to be more like $120/bbl to balance their budget, no? Not familiar with the situation in Nigeria, but they too need closer to $120/bbl. I’m probably wrong, but again, I was under the impression several countries (Algeria being the other one that comes to mind) already couldn’t produce any more if they wanted to without significant investment in infrastructure which won’t happen with prices where they are.

        • Devolution

          You are correct, these countries all have break even points well over $100 but I used that number to make the point.

          You are also correct in saying that they won’t increase production immediately, because they can’t, but it will happen, especially in countries that have monopolistic state oil companies, like Venezuela and Saudi.

          • Salty

            I would expect the Saudis to maintain or expand production, sure (they are to my understanding the ones driving the bus on current OPEC policy), but again, I wasn’t aware Venezuela were going to be in a position to expand production any time soon. Again, I’m probably wrong but my understanding of the situation was that OPEC policy will only remain static as long as SA can keep the other member states under control. As even some of it’s closer gulf state allies are apparently taking issue with them right now that timeline might potentially be much shorter than the timeline for increased production capacity in Venezuela, Nigeria, Algeria, Iraq, etc.

            @The Rookie

            No question there, it affects everyone in the province, I’m just saying I don’t think things are quite as bleak as you were painting them to potentially be. The economy in this city (Calgary) is still booming despite the fall in oil prices, and while I expect reality to set back in eventually I don’t think it’s reasonable to say the sky is falling just yet. That is all.

    • pkam

      Paajarvi is 1 pt -2 and 8 hits in 10 games.
      If Hitchcock can’t motivate him to play more physical, I wonder that MacT or Nelson can.

      Matt Fraser is 3 pts -5 and 42 hits and 1 fight in 24 games. I’ll take Fraser over Paajarvi at this moment.

    • vituperative detritus

      Sam Gagner has one productive week and all of a sudden he would be good for this team? Seriously?

      Just ignore the 11 (3-8-11) points in the first 31 games, and his plus minus, and his defensive deficiencies, and his face off ability.

      Maybe he would be a viable NHL center if he played every game against the Oilers. Hell, if the Coyotes only played the Oilers they would be at the top of the standings.

  • Spydyr

    Santa brought me a hat and two Team Canada T-shirts.A few years back they would of been Oilers merchandise.I’m guessing Santa delivered a lot less Oilier merchandise this year.

  • vituperative detritus

    I have seen others post in the past that you have to pay a small amount every year to stay on the waiting list, can anyone confirm or deny that?

  • ThinkingOutLoud

    And here I was waiting for housing prices to rebound so I could GTFO of the Clareview townhouse I paid almost 300K at the height of the market in 2009…

    Just shoot me in the face already, Edmonton – this constant kicking in the sack between the economy and the way the Oilers play is getting tiresome…

    Maybe @Archeologuy wants to go halfers on a tanker truck of bleach with me?

  • Burnward

    The price of oil will never stay at these prices.it is being used as a tool,for many many reasons and long term gains and goals.it however May stay low long enough to crush wages of the working man and create massive interest increases and massive inflation.anyone who bought the most expensive house they could afford,when rates were low,could be in huge trouble…. Oh wait,that’s the Alberta way,and covers most of the province. Hold onto your butts,this could get messy.

    Also,let’s add an 18yr old Ladislav Smid (9th overall) to the long list of high end talent,that the Oilers have rushed into the league too soon,he had very little North American experience,but was thrown into the lineup,because of the void Pronger left.but hey,he was a high pick,so clearly he was ready for the big leagues,right Lowe?we have 3 draft successes in the last 15yrs,Hall,RNH and Ebs.otherwise we’ve had so many 1st round busts like 11th overall Miknov,Schremp,MAP,Plante,MPS,Dubnyk and how many others?this is why the team has no depth,and why the cupboards are bare.Sorry Katz,but your tenure of the Oilers is becoming the teams darkest days.I’d hate to see how the fans would be reacting,if that new arena wasn’t being built.its the only positive surrounding this team right now,and that’s scary stuff.

      • Salty

        But what would this province be without people buying over-priced, poorly built homes in terrible neighbourhoods far away from anything? Ugly suburban sprawl and equally ugly mortgages are as Albertan as it gets.

          • Salty

            Vancouver’s worse suck doesn’t make our suck suck less. When it’s cheaper to rent a nice condo in a city like Montreal or Toronto than to rent a 250-500 sq.foot studio in downtown Calgary (obviously it’s worse here than in Edmonton, but still) I don’t really care about how bad Vancouver’s housing crisis is in comparison.

            Also there’s the downside of having to live in Calgary, and I wouldn’t wish that on any of you.

          • Salty

            That’s because of foreign investment.there are numerous,beautiful high rises in downtown Vancouver,that are empty,because they are owned by foreigners who spend very little time there.downfall of being one of the most beautiful cities on earth.if Edmonton had views of something other than refineries and a river that looks like chocolate milk,the prices would be out of control there too.

  • WTF2

    I foresee the up coming year as one of those times when in 20 years from now we will be saying things like ” it was a combination of little and larger issues that led to the Collapse…” I don’t know the numbers but let’s say that directly the oil patch is responsible for 30% of our work force. And I’m not even counting indirectly like the pizza delivery guy out in Conklin that makes $700 a night in tips driving to the camps.

    Now if Oil companies needed to downsize to match current prices and laid off 50% of workforce because of a 50% price drop then all of a sudden 15% of albertans are unemployed. Yes some of them will find other jobs but those jobs were held, or would have been held by people not employed by Oil so it’s a wash.

    I work in residential construction. If an additional 15% of albertans are unemployed, or finding jobs for lesser pay, then there is less recreational money being spent on fun things like hockey games, movies, snow mobiles etc, so that people can still pay bills. Some of those people won’t be able to pay all their bills. And some of those people will lose their houses. If there starts to be an abundance of houses available, and lack of people able to buy new houses ( and let’s not forget, those who would still be able to, wouldn’t because it’s too risky) then builders stop building new houses.

    I would wager a guess that construction is the next largest Albertan industry. So those 2 industries are now collapsing. And let’s not forget the 6 new condominium towers being built that will sit near empty because -1 no one can afford them and -2 the businesses we were banking on moving into the office space on the lower levels decided to stay in Vancouver or move to Texas.

    So for all of you who think that the price of Oil dropping doesn’t affect you, I dare you to remind yourself of that when you lose your painting job to the roughneck who is married to the bosses sister or when u have to sell your house before you lose it because the accounting firm you work for has to downsize because of the big contract that just went to the other guys that took a big cut just to get it….

    Economics folks, it’s not just for the other guys

      • Burnward

        funny you should say that. I used to work in disaster restoration. And given the right circumstances- old plumbing, lack of back flow preventers, poor drainage systems, there is almost always someone’s basement that floods when it rains.

        Do I think that it’s always a disaster? Nope

        Do I think that corporations and desicions makers are more jumpy than my conclusions, yup.

        They don’t leave things to chance. They don’t cross their fingers and hope for prices to go up. A 50% price cut goes well past profit and into the red. People have already lost jobs to minimize damage. Yes things could turn around. But the markets are not full of people with attitudes of ” let’s see how this plays out”. If people and businesses think they are going to lose money or shares, they will cut ties before loses become larger than they are now. Cause and effect.

          • I’m not saying it’s going to happen. But when things slowed down last time, I watched the construction company I worked for go from 140 employees to 20. And then the overhead stayed the same, the employees that stayed were the best of the best so wages were considerably higher then they should have been, for the per person aspect, even those of us who stayed took pay cuts. They lower end guys who were cut couldn’t find jobs and went home to Nfld and Sask.

            My wife is a nurse. And at the time had left one position to take a better one at a private firm. She then got pregnant and when she had to leave on maternity she didn’t qualify for Mat-Leave so had to give up her new position. It was also around the time that the Govt decided to do away with health care premiums. Most of the general public liked this-similar to low prices at the pumps. But with that lack of income coming in, AHS placed a hiring freeze into effect. Nursing is union so those with jobs were fine, but as my wife had left to go for Mgmt, that was out of the unions reach. Then as she tried to go back after the baby was born, only those within the unions could be hired and Mgmts positions were being cut and workloads spread out.

            Like my original post, a bunch of little issues coupled with a few larger ones. It doesn’t always lead to a flood, but it could just as easily turn out that way.

        • Salty

          Corporations and decision makers also do more research than you, and don’t take up scorched earth policies at the first sign of trouble. Oil prices are being kept artificially low right now by the OPEC cartel, and won’t stay that way indefinitely. The sky isn’t falling just yet even if the potential is there.

          Also regarding your initial post the construction industry is, to my knowledge, smaller than the service industry in this province as far as number of Albertans employed goes. Same thing applies, but just an fyi.

          • Butters

            I don’t think OPEC drives the bus as much anymore. The US fracking boom is a big part of depressed prices.

            I did read an article which stated the US is fracking the easy Oil now. The process will get more expensive as time goes by. Maybe. maybe not, but I bet the market does not like the price where it is now and a more palatable trading range will be found eventually.

          • Salty

            That’s the thing though, OPEC flooding the market with cheap oil right now is a direct response to the US fracking boom in an attempt to make it less economically feasible. We’ll have to wait and see exactly what the end result of OPEC’s game of chicken is, but it’s a safe bet to assume prices will rise eventually, even if they aren’t likely to return to the kinds of highs that made this province filthy rich.

          • Poke Check

            Well then I would assume that if Oil and Construction took a huge hit, it would have even larger implications on Service. And I would assume that most people in the service industry – and please keep in mind, I am not close minded and do not think that my opinions are by any means law. And if I am wrong about anything I post I appologize. I have no researched fact, just observations- most people in the service industry I believe would currently fall in the lower half of Salary and wages? Therefore when those who fall in the top of the wage earnings need to tighten their belts a little, and not go out to eat or what have you, it greatly handcuffs those who rely on people splurging for meals and tips. Adding to the economic strain.

            * when I hear service industry I automatically think servers. I know it goes way beyond that but I always have a bias for how little most servers make, and how much they rely on tips.

            * and on that note when you rely on tips, please EARN said tips, instead of just expecting it.

            * this rant kind of went all over the place, sorry

          • Kr55

            Actually the second largest industry in AB is Agriculture and has been for many years, in revenue at least. With the large spike in beef prices (farmers get when selling not at the grocery store) lately and grains expect for a couple really good agriculture years and more jobs on farms than there has been in many years.

            I have to agree with you for large urban centers though and it seems like logical cause and effect.

            However the economics of oil as a non-renewable resource and scarcity mean it has to go up. When? I have no idea or be right with Wayne buying futures, models etc.

            *great rant

          • Rod the Viking

            Are you a grain farmer? I am and right now most crops are 40-70% of 3 years ago and most imputs are up.
            This is another industry that is in for a big correction, unless you are into beef cattle it isn’t looking too rosy.

          • No I do not farm but we manufacture equipment in the industry at my place of work. I’ll admit my knowledge is definitely third hand (I’m in Concrete Division) and we are mostly in beef and seeing the rise there. We have many farmers that work here out of Olds, and they seem to be doing well but have diversified to barley and canola.

            Thanks for letting me know about the grains. Who would have thought that Id learn anything non Oilers on the Nation.

            Good luck on the upcoming season.

      • Bahahahahahaha

        You do know why divorce is so expensive don’t you?

        A- because it’s worth it

        I dedicate this post to my ex wife,
        and also to the woman of my dreams- who will in turn make a great, next ex wife!

  • Salty

    Add to all that a badly overbought, overvalued housing market.

    Even if the bank of Canada doesn’t tighten their rate policy, the US bond market will eventually cause the cost of borrowing to rise, which will correlate with a fall in house prices.

    When the tradesmen in Edmonton see the imaginary equity they thought they had in their hideous new-build mcmansions evaporate they will feel a lot less inclined to eat out at the keg every week.

  • sportsjunkie007

    I recently went back to Edmonton to visit friends. Looking around, I would suggest that a lot of people should spend their Oilers money elsewhere. Gym memberships and driver’s education courses would be wisely spent money for many, many people.

  • Kr55

    The end of the free ride fans and businesses have been giving Katz, Lowe and Lowe’s Friends is the only good thing that can come out of the Oil price drop. Bittersweet I suppose for Oil fans in AB. Hopefully it pays off and we finally have NHL quality management soon. Then the Oil price can shoot right back up afterwards 🙂

  • Butters

    Oil is purchased in US dollars. It is produced here in Alberta with CAD dollars. The currency difference provides a bit of a cushion.

    Regardless, the Oilers are going to have to start competing harder for our dollars. They can start with winning and see where that takes them.

  • Salty

    I don’t think the issues you have pointed out are lost to the likes of Katz, Nicholson and Laforge. It is not so difficult to visualize a less than full Rogers place in 2016. It might be the fans turn to tell Katz and the Oil they will have to be patient. After all it takes some time to rebuild fan loyalty.