Monday Mailbag – June 15th

NugeMail

It’s your favourite time of the week! The mailbag is back with the answers to all the questions you’ve always been wondering about.  If you want to submit a question, just email it to me at baggedmilk@oilersnation.com or hit me up on Twitter. The questions don’t all have to be Oilers related, so be creative. Our panel brings a world of wisdom and will be sure to answer your dilemma. It’s your time to shine, Nation. Enjoy.

Offer

1) Craig Davies asks – Why don’t we see more offer sheets being tossed around? There seems to be an unwritten rule amongst GMs and it doesn’t make much sense to me.

Jonathan Willis:

We do see them some times, most recently with Shea Weber. Mostly, because to make an offer the other team can’t match a G.M. generally needs to overpay in money and then hand over a massive pile of draft picks, plus risk reprisal. General managers are risk averse; I think eventually we’ll see offer sheets become more common but one needs to really work out for a team first before the imitators will follow.

Lowetide:

I agree with your assertion. The NHL has a perfectly good tool for GMs to use and they refuse. It’s crazy, hopefully Peter Chiarelli puts an end to the OS drought.

Robin Brownlee:

What part doesn’t make sense to you? Offer sheets not only involve an over pay in salary but compensatory draft picks. You are also taking the price point in negotiating new deals out of the hands of the team that has the player. While it’s allowed under the CBA, it’s a predatory move. Why not make a hockey trade instead?

Jeanshorts:

It doesn’t make much sense to me either. I mean, to an extent I understand the theory of not wanting to piss off other GMs, making your own roster vulnerable to an offer sheet. But it seems silly that all 30 GMs seem so afraid to rock the boat by taking advantage of a perfectly legal way to acquire talent. Those GM meetings must be a HELLUVA good time seeing as everyone is the best of friends! Though there definitely is a bit of gambling involved in all of it. Take the Oilers for example; obviously Dougie Hamilton would be a huge get, and could potentially be the Oilers #1 defenseman for a solid decade. HOWEVER, if the Oilers have to give up a 1st, 2nd, and 3rd rounder in a year where they could theoretically be picking inside the top 10 again, that could leave the prospects cupboard pretty bare. I personally would rather have a 21 year old stud defenseman than another bag of magic beans, but if I’m Chiarelli the gamble there is definitely something I’m thinking about. 

Long story short I would love it if offer sheets just started flying around non-stop. It would create so much chaos! THINK OF ALL THE BARN FIGHTING REVENUE!

Jason Gregor:

You have to overpay a player and give up compensation, which is a double whammy. 

Average annual value

Compensation

Less than $1,205,377

Nothing

$1,205,377-to-$1,826,328

Third-round pick

$1,826,328-to-$3,652,659

Second-round pick

$3,652,659-to-$5,478,986

First and third-round picks

$5,478,986-to-$7,305,316

First, second and third-round picks

$7,305,316-to-$9,131,645

Two firsts, a second and third-round picks

$9,131,645 or greater

Four first-round picks

If you want to sign a top-end player the compensation is considerable. If you signed a 3rd or 4th line player to a $3.6 mill deal and only had to surrender a 2nd round pick then I’d strongly consider it. I believe teams would match, however, and often teams don’t want to make an offer sheet just for the sake or making one. If they make the offer, they want the other team to walk away, and usually that means you overpay significantly.

Matt Henderson:

I think there is an unwritten rule and it’s sort of a mutually assured destruction arrangement but the reality is that it’s a tool that should be used more often. The salary cap is going to prevent rich teams from just choking out the poorer ones with RFA offers. At the end of the day everyone has the same amount of money to allocate towards the cap. Beyond the unwritten stuff, probably the biggest reason teams don’t do it is because it isn’t guaranteed. GMs have to put all the work in devising an offer the player will accept and the other team might not match and yet still they match fairly often. You trade for a guy, he’s yours. You sign a UFA, he’s yours. Sign an RFA and you have to wait a week to find out.

Jason Strudwick:

That is a good question. As a GM I would be looking for a great opportunity to use them but would be reluctant to pull the trigger. Although offer sheets are part of the system, using them puts a target on your back.

Baggedmilk:

I love offer sheets. I think GMs often forget that the NHL is supposed to be entertainment and offer sheets would be another flavour of entertaining for fans. I wish there was more of them. Now, that being said, I understand that they don’t offer sheet other team’s players because they don’t want the same thing happening, but I still wish for more of them. They bring a sense of drama to the NHL even in the boring summer months. 

BuyOut

2) ChasingStanley asks – Do you see the Oilers buying anyone out this summer? If so who are your candidates?

Jonathan Willis:

Nikita Nikitin. Ideally, a salary-retained trade sends him away at the draft, but if that doesn’t happen it makes sense to bite the bullet and buy him out.

Lowetide:

I think they could, with Niki Nikitin being the No. 1 candidate. The Oilers have cap room, so PC may decide to let the 2015-16 contracts run but there’s value in a buyout imo.

Robin Brownlee:

Nikita Nikitin is the obvious choice although I’m not sure Chiarelli will do it unless he lands a proven player to take his place.

Jeanshorts:

I doubt it. As much as we would all love to pretend the Nikitin signing never happened, he’s still a (barely) able-bodied defenseman, and his contract isn’t as big of an anchor as we make it out to be. They can afford to eat this one last year and be rid of him forever next summer. And other than that no one else has that bad of a contract, as far as I’m concerned. I mean, Nuge/Hall/Ebs are a perfectly reasonable $6 Mill cap hit each. And as of right now the Oilers have just over $20 million in cap space to work with. As bad as the pervious management regimes have been, at least they haven’t handcuffed the team with a bunch of Clarkson-esque contracts.

Jason Gregor:

Only one I see is Nikitin, but even that is doubtful. The Oilers are unlikely to make the playoffs next season, so it makes sense to just pay him for a year and then be free of his salary next summer. Same goes for Teddy Purcell. If you buy them out, then you are wasting $1.5 mill against the cap next year for nothing. Unless Chiarelli wants to send a message that Nikitin’s lack of commitment to the team (not being in great shape last year) is unacceptable, I’d be surprised to see a buyout.

Matt Henderson:

I think Nikita Nikitin is the only one that the Oilers need to consider buying out. It’s a brutal contract for a brutal player and buying out his one year means only two years of cap penalty after the buyout. The best option is probably retaining 50% of his salary and finding a suitor, but good luck with that. I wouldn’t buy out anyone else. Ference is next on the list but you have to wait a year.

Jason Strudwick:

Tough to say, there are some candidates. I would take a hard look at Nikitin. PC should have a very honest discussion with him to see where he is at for next season.

Baggedmilk:

The minute Nikitin’s pen hit the paper on his contract he was a prime candidate for a buyout. I don’t see it happening though. Nikitin only has one year left to ride out whereas buying him out would keep him on the books (albeit at a lowered rate) for two years. I bet Chiarelli tries to move him for literally anything, or just rides the season out. 

ThisThat

3) Mike K. asks – How would you characterize the gap between Eichel and McDavid? Is there any chance (barring injury) that Eichel has a better career than McDavid?  Or is McDavid simply in a league of his own?  I ask because no one seems to be debating whether Eichel should be considered as the first pick this year.  Is it that clear-cut in your view?

Jonathan Willis:

Based on what the scouts say, it feels like the gap between Taylor Hall and Sidney Crosby – a good No. 1 overall pick and a truly generational talent.

Lowetide:

I’m not qualified to make that kind of projection but absolutely agree Eichel could turn out to be the better player. The one thing not in doubt is McDavid’s being the clearly better player now and that bodes well for his future. They’re very likely to have phenomenal talents.

Robin Brownlee:

I defer to the scouts who have viewed these players for hundreds/thousands of hours. The consensus is McDavid is the clear-cut No. 1. I can make no compelling argument that contradicts that.

Jeanshorts:

The gap is bigger than the cute one between Jordan Eberle’s front teeth! Actually I’m going to take a bit of a contrarian stance on this one; I think they’re going to be more of an Ovi/Malkin situation than a Crosby/Bobby Ryan. Connor McDavid is the best junior player I’ve seen since Sid (stop me if you’ve heard that before), and he’s going to be an absolute superstar, but Jack Eichel is no slouch either. As an 18 year old freshman, playing his first year of college hockey he put up 71 points in 40 games, playing against guys who were two to three years older than him, who had already been drafted, been to pro training camps, etc. That’s unbelievable. In any other draft year he’d be the belle of the ball, which is the same thing that happened to Malkin. He’s one of the best players in the world, has scored at rate which is a razors edge higher than Ovechkin (1.19 points per game for Geno compared to 1.17 for Ovi) plays a similar, power forward style of game as Ovi, and yet, I would still take Ovechkin over Malkin any day of the week. There’s just something special about him. I can’t put my finger on it, but there is. 

I think McDavid is going to have an advantage coming out of the gate, getting to play with Hall/Nuge/Eberle/etc, whereas Eichel gets to play with…. Matt Moulson? Tyler Ennis? But I have a feeling, all things being equal injury wise, their careers are going to be a lot closer than people are predicting. It’s going to be a super fun rivalry to watch (hopefully)!

Jason Gregor:

Eichel is very good. He is also considered a generational player. I’d say the gap will be similar to Crosby/Malkin. McDavid sees the game on a level like no one else in his draft, and that is why he’s the consensus number one.

Matt Henderson:

Since they haven’t played in the same league I guess there’s a sense of “We can’t really tell” regarding the gap between them, but McDavid is number one with a bullet at this point. NOBODY can tell the future so anything is possible. To me McDavid has the ability to be the best player in the NHL before the end of his ELC. I’ve only seen him play maybe 10-12 games but I’ve never seen anybody else who actually created something fantastic on every single shift before.

Jason Strudwick:

I think they will both be very strong players with different styles. What Eichel did in the NCAA as a freshman is very impressive. He is a great prospect, but when I see the way McDavid carries the puck up the ice, crossing over in ever changing sequences, I would not pass him by on the first pick. The debate will follow them around till they retire.

Baggedmilk:

I honestly don’t know the answer to this question. McDavid has been consistently ranked #1 ahead of Jack Eichel but it seems like the gap is very very narrow. I assume this is a very similar Taylor or Tyler type situation that we’ll be hearing about for the next 15 years. I don’t want to not answer the question though, so I’m going to say that McDavid is like poutine and Eichel is like fries and gravy. Both are great, but one is better.

NelsonBalloon

4) Vetinari asks – What’s your prediction as to where Todd Nelson will be coaching come September 2015?

Jonathan Willis:

Pittsburgh’s AHL farm team. Nelson wants to be an NHL head coach, and I would guess that he sees his best chance as coming with another organization as an AHL coach. Pittsburgh is a good landing spot because a slow start could cost their head coach his job. Carolina’s AHL job is probably appealing for the same reasons, though the Hurricanes roster is a lot less impressive than the Penguins’.

Lowetide:

Scranton, PA.

Robin Brownlee:

Grand Rapids in the AHL.

Jeanshorts:

I’m going to trust Matty’s hall of fame instincts and say he’ll land in Grand Rapids, coaching the Detroit farm team. I mean, to me it makes the most sense; he played there for three seasons and got his first AHL coaching gig as an assistant for the Griffins. Combine that with his recent success helping quite a few Oiler prospects make the jump to the big leagues while coaching the Barons to four consecutive playoff appearances and he seems like a no brainer for a team with as rich a development history as the Red Wings have had for decades. God speed Uncle Todd. We hardly knew ye.

Jason Gregor:

In the AHL. He wants to  be a head coach. He feels he is a head coach and he’d rather be one in the AHL than be an assistant, especially in an organization that overlooked him on three different occasions for the head coaching job.

Matt Henderson:

I’m going with Detroit’s AHL team. Nelson’s name has popped up all over the place in the last week and all of them in reference to HC jobs in the AHL. I think it’s just a matter of time before he gets hired away from the Oilers. We’re going to lose a good one, I think.

Jason Strudwick:

Looks like in the AHL. 2016 he will be behind a NHL bench.

Baggedmilk:

Sure seems like he’s going to be a head coach in the AHL within the coming days. I still think there would be value to having him hone his craft under an experienced head coach in Todd McLellan. To me, he knows all he needs to know coaching at the AHL level but having the ability to watch McLellan maneuver would only help him in the long run. I’m still holding out hope.

McDavidDreamin

5) Bradley M. asks – What is your favourite memory of being a hockey fan? Was it being at a specific game? Watching with friends? Thank you in advance.

Jonathan Willis:

My favourite memory is my first NHL game, between Vancouver and Edmonton. Dad took me, my brother and my best friend to the game (I believe it was the 2002-03 season) and my best friend and I got to sit one row up from the glass. The whole thing was amazing but the one moment I remember the most was Janne Niinimaa getting hit by Matt Cooke right in front of me. Cooke was flying, the boards and the glass shook and my first thought was that Niinimaa was dead, which was quickly followed by the thought that he was seriously injured, which was just as quickly followed by him bouncing back to his feet and skating away like nothing had happened. It’s a little thing; I’m probably the only person on Earth who remembers that hit, but it was the first time I really appreciated how amazing these athletes were.

Lowetide:

I used to watch games with my whole family as a kid, watching the Leafs on Saturday and then the adults moved to the table for the card game. I always stayed with the broadcast to the end, past the three stars and the entire HNIC song. That’s my favorite hockey memory, my Grandma’s house, plaster walls, beer, laughter, smoking, black and white tv, Dave Keon, the warmest quilt in the history of time. All of the people who were with me are gone now, but I’ll never forget any of them. 

That’s my favourite memory and the reason I’m a fan to this day.

Robin Brownlee:

Listening to Jim Robson call Vancouver Canucks games on CKNW radio. The Canucks were lousy but Robson was great. I was also thrilled to meet Robson for the first time in the media lounge at Pacific Coliseum in 1981 or 82 after I somehow convinced the Canucks to issue me a season media pass while I was still in journalism school. Man, was I out of my league.

Jeanshorts:

Not a specific game in particular, but we’ve always had a blast when the World Juniors are in Europe, the games start at like three in the morning, and the boys come over with some cases of beer and we’re all passed out by 8AM. Hazy memories, but some fun ones.

Jason Gregor:

Being at Gretzky’s jersey retirement. The feeling of respect and nostalgia in the building was amazing. Every person in the rink, including Gretzky, was caught up in the emotion of the ceremony.

Matt Henderson:

My favourite memories of being a hockey fan are just hanging out with my dad watching hours of hockey. He had satellite with all the channels (that he TOTALLY paid for) and I would come back from school and we would go downstairs and just flip from game to game watching the Eastern games then Western games. If you had ever met my Dad you would know that we were very different except both of us could just watch hockey all the time. Of all the different hockey memories I have, my most fond ones are just hanging out with him.

Jason Strudwick:

My strongest memory is as a player. The first time my NHL team made the playoffs was a very special feeling. Everything about the playoffs is different. I didn’t get a lot of time in playoffs but that is a feeling I will never forget.

Baggedmilk:

My favourite hockey memory is probably what cemented my love for the game. When I was a kid my dad used to occasionally win tickets to the games at work and he would take me. We’re talking about the early/mid 90s here and Rexall was only half full at the best of times. I remember my dad taking me down to the glass during warm up so that I could watch the guys up close. This was also when fans were able to walk down and stand outside the dressing room waiting for autographs and I got a lot of them this way. I didn’t get to go to games often, but when I was lucky enough to go it was always a special time and my dad is the greatest for recognizing how much I loved going.

      • camdog

        Imagine Shea Webber’s next 6 months after Nashville matched the Philly offer. For a player an offer sheet can be like a kid going through an ugly divorce. O’Reilly in Colorado another example, who really wants to put them self in this position? Things would have to be pretty bad for me personally to put myself in this type of position.

    • Lofty

      Yes, figure since there will only be a couple fans there they might let me on the floor. At which point I’ll grab the phone and trade Nikitin for Weber.

      Also catching the STL @ MIA ballgame on the Thursday. In true Miami fashion, watching professional sports in outstanding and empty arena’s/ stadiums for cheap prices. Draft tickets are free.

      • El Guapo

        Just go, its a once in a lifetime opportunity. Plus the tickets are free (won some myself) and for $90 you can add in all you can eat and drink at the arena for the first night!

      • paul wodehouse

        Go to Florida as it is worth while , but the draft itself might bore you to tears after Oilers draft McDavid . Was at the one here , and it was super boring even in the boxes with free food and drink ,etc..

  • Canadian Hockey Fan

    Crazy to think that Rexall was half full at one point in time. I think what really saved this team from relocating were those 97 and 98 teams that went to the second round. What new hockey fans don’t understand is that if the Oilers missed the playoffs for 9 straight seasons in the 90s, chances are this team would be in its 17th season in Houston. Edmonton was also smaller than Winnipeg back in those days, which someone McDavid’s age might find hard to believe.

    • Canadian Hockey Fan

      Not 100% factual, in 1996 Edmonton was actually larger than Calgary.

      (1996)
      Toronto (Ont.) 4,263,757
      Montréal †(Que.) 3,326,510
      Vancouver †(B.C.) 1,831,665
      Ottawa – Hull (Que. / Ont.) 1,010,498
      Edmonton (Alta.) 862,597
      Calgary (Alta.) 821,628
      Québec † (Que.) 671,889
      Winnipeg (Man.) 667,209
      Hamilton (Ont.) 624,360
      London (Ont.) 398,616

      But still a worthwhile point.

  • camdog

    If Kevin Lowe got his way Taylor Hall and RnH wouldn’t be Oilers and Vanek would have been traded for a first round pick. The Oilers example is one of a number of reasons why GM’s are scared to put out the offer on a RFA.

  • Jordan McNugent-Hallkins

    One of my favorite hockey memories is almost the same as Willis’, only it was Tom Poti getting his face smashed into the glass right in front of me. It was one of my first live games and I can still remember the smear of spit he left on the glass. I was really young, so the sound of those guys hitting the boards was like a train wreck.

  • Jordan McNugent-Hallkins

    I think whoever is representing from Oilersnation should get together for a beer at least with gregor and shoot the sh@t while celebrating our victory of Connor McDavid.

  • Jordan McNugent-Hallkins

    Offer sheets are good for players , but a nightmare for management . Drives up the costs for every club in a cap era , as most are matched , which is bad . Can see it happening to Oilers with several players in the near future . Cost certainty is compromised in a cap era by offer sheets . The less that use it , the best for all .

    Eichel and McDavid projected comparison : Top end – room for most improvement over next 3-4 years , McDavid appears to have quite an edge in future potential over Eichel I project . They’ll maybe be close this year , but McDavid should start pulling away in 2nd year , and next 4-5 years widen that gap .

  • Jordan McNugent-Hallkins

    Hockey Memory, front row in the corner seat (so you can still see the entire ice), Oilers vs Dallas, Oilers mount a late game come back and there was a TV timeout with only a few minutes left. I remember the crowd was absolutely insane, and Mike Modano stood their at the blue line by the penalty box waiting to take the face off with no Oiler around (over by their bench) and he just looked around the building in awe of the fans and the noise. I was close enough that I could see him slightly shaking his head in disbelief. Oilers scored late to win. Incredible game but I’ll always remember that modano moment and the realization that Oilers fans are a special bread.

  • El Guapo

    Favorite memory as a kid: The Oilers rattling off 5 Cups in 7 years. Thought the good times would never end. Watched them all with my dad

    Favorite memory after that: Todd Marchant OT winner against Dallas shortly after Cujo robbed Nieuwendyk

    Favorite live memory: First two games that I saw were the same weekend. Edmonton-Pittsburgh (Jagr was magnificent) followed by Edmonton-St. Louis (First time seeing Gretzky in person. It was short lived as Bucky flattened him with a cheap shot)

      • El Guapo

        Ha ha ha! Don’t forget the other side of that, though.

        1) I’m just about 38, which kind of sucks
        2) I’ve been waiting 25 years for them to win another
        3) I’ve had to suffer through a bunch of years of the Oilers missing the playoffs or getting knocked out early when they did make it (2006 excepted), horrible drafting, good players constantly being traded away because of financial problems, etc.

        Yeah, I feel for the younger fans who didn’t see the great teams and have had to suffer through a bunch of horrible seasons, but I think that we can all be pretty excited about what’s coming up. Hopefully these guys can get their act together and give us a lot to cheer about.

  • El Guapo

    Quick question with regards to Timo Meier. I believe he is a right winger. If the Oilers draft him, does this make Yakupov Expendable? He seems to have identical skills, just not the draft pedigree of Yakupov.

  • I actually hope the Oilers do less this summer than most are hoping.

    I would like to see them trade the 33 pick and Schultz for Talbot, and offer sheet Hamilton at 7.3 million for 5 years.

    If both of those go through we get another great player with the 16th pic that can develop in junior AHL for a few more years.

    I would also try to trade one of Ference or Nikitin while retaining salary.

    I run lines of

    Hall – Mcdavid – Yakupov

    Pouliot – Nuge – Eberle

    Draisatl – Lander – Purcell

    Hendricks – Gordon – Klinkhammer

    Nurse – Hamilton

    Klefbom – Fayne

    Marcinin – Ference/Nikitin

    Talbot

    Scrivens

    I know everyone will flip out when they see where I have Nurse and I may very well play them as my second pairing, but i want them to develop chemistry right from the start as I see them as the future of the club.

  • Stoic Coach

    Saturday, May 19, 1984; Northlands Coliseum; 6pm-9pm.

    10 years old with my Dad in section X. Don’t know how he scored the tickets, but looked forward to the game all day. Was actually shaking with excitement.

    What a scene…a city going nuts…orange and blue pom poms, streamers, tin foil Stanley cups everywhere. I remember Messier losing it right in front of our section as the final seconds counted down; he just stood there cheering.

    Tough to replace that day.

  • Canadian Hockey Fan

    Regarding buyouts:

    Players not fulfilling their performance expectations are slowly strangling most teams in the NHL. Although GMs are not without blame, it’s unfair to a team or a fanbase when a player craps the bed after signing a big contract, and handcuffs a team sometimes for decades. I think there are still vibrations in Edmonton from the Horcoff and Pisani contracts.

    My solution would be a “Reasonable Expectations Hearing.”

    Each player, upon signing his first NHL contract, would be eligible to initiate one such hearing, and have one initiated against him during his career.

    An understanding of “reasonable expectations” would be agreed upon during contract negotiations, and any substantial performance deviation – in either direction – could be addressed at the end of any season. Much like the current salary arbitration hearings. The resulting decision could be for instance, a salary raise mid-contract to reflect performance. Or alternatively the cancelling (or reduction) of a contract to reflect poor performance.

    Players advantage: Late-blooming players who out-perform contracts will have a chance to bump up to market value.

    Teams advantage: Players who phone it in, or who’s performance declines drastically will have their contract cancelled, and be free to pursue opportunities with another team.

    The NHLPA shouldn’t have an issue, as any player who plays himself out of the league will be replaced by another dues-paying player.

    Guaranteed contracts are killing this league. Death by a thousand paper cuts. Just my thoughts.

    • Leaking5w-30

      I don’t understand why a buyout counts against the cap. Teams should be able to buy guys out at anytime to free up cap space. If the player is worth his salt he will get a new deal on a different team and in addition to his buyout end up making more money.

  • AJ88

    Offer sheets? Drives up salaries, compensation is way over the top, the team that has developed the RFA gets screwed over, entertainment for BM but not great for business of the NHL overall.

    Fond memories, the Oil Kings in their heyday in the old Edmonton Gardens, what a great atmosphere to watch hockey and the best ice to play on.

  • AJ88

    My favourite hockey memory is getting a Tampa Bay Lightning (black away yersey at the time) with my last name on the back and fave #6 for Christmas in 92-93 when they first came in the league. I was 10yrs old and already a diehard hockey fan (Mario Lemieux was my favourite). That was my first time learning about expansion and the idea of a new team coming into the league was beyond exciting. I wore that jersey everywhere and still own it today. I will pass it on to my oldest son and he can wear it when he plays street hockey just as I did. This is also one of my favourite christmas memories as a kid. I think I also got hockey gloves for christmas that year too. They were red and I was bummed they didn’t match the lightning jersey but they went with my Habs jersesy nicely.

  • AJ88

    Oiler’s first Stanley Cup. What a feeling. They were NHL Champs! This is a set up from the CFL (though I still feel the Grey Cup is a great thing too. But it’s not the Stanley Cup).

    Had to do something so headed to Jasper Avenue thinking a few other people might be there. . .

  • camdog

    “As bad as the pervious management regimes have been, at least they haven’t handcuffed the team with a bunch of Clarkson-esque contracts.”

    Not for a lack of trying…

    • camdog

      Ya it’s sort of funny that the Oilers were the team that bid that contract up. Pretty sure Toronto would have gotten Clarkson for less if Mact wasn’t offering up, what was it a half a million per season more.

  • camdog

    Lowetide:

    I used to watch games with my whole family as a kid, watching the Leafs on Saturday and then the adults moved to the table for the card game. I always stayed with the broadcast to the end, past the three stars and the entire HNIC song. That’s my favorite hockey memory, my Grandma’s house, plaster walls, beer, laughter, smoking, black and white tv, Dave Keon, the warmest quilt in the history of time. All of the people who were with me are gone now, but I’ll never forget any of them.

    That’s my favourite memory and the reason I’m a fan to this day.

    Family, HNIC… You, sir, win the Internet. Well done,LT, well done.

  • Eichel is going to probably have a chance to play with Evander Kane. They also have a ton of prospects, and $26 million in cap space currently. It’s possible that they can add players via trade or through free agency. They also have a lot of depth at centre so we could see one of their elite prospects on the wing for Eichel. A top line of Eichel, Reinhart and Kane is pretty darn good.

    This is not to say that Eichel will be better. Just that there is going to be some elite talent around him.

  • Armchair_Gm

    So many great oiler memories I can never remember specific games but I was a huge Curtis Joseph fan and that guy stole a lot of games back in the day. The 2006 playoffs too even though I was a stars fan by that point. Was great to see the city all cheering like that

    • El Guapo

      erm . . . why are you here?

      “by that point” . . . so you switched sides to a team that was having a lot of success at that point?

      I don’t know how you can look yourself in the mirror. What a disgrace.

      Now, if we’ve misread your comment, please clarify, but if you’re a “floor crosser” you should be ashamed of yourself.

      TH

      • Canadian Hockey Fan

        Armchair_Gm – the world’s most passionate Chicago Blackhawks fan! Congratulations Armchair_Gm, it’s great when a team to which are so dedicated wins the Cup!

        I’m sure Oiler fans will be celebrating a Cup win in the near term.

        Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah!

  • Canadian Hockey Fan

    Lowetide:

    I used to watch games with my whole family as a kid, watching the Leafs on Saturday and then the adults moved to the table for the card game. I always stayed with the broadcast to the end, past the three stars and the entire HNIC song. That’s my favorite hockey memory, my Grandma’s house, plaster walls, beer, laughter, smoking, black and white tv, Dave Keon, the warmest quilt in the history of time. All of the people who were with me are gone now, but I’ll never forget any of them.

    That’s my favourite memory and the reason I’m a fan to this day.

    Lowetide – you have a special way with words. Enough to choke a guy up.

  • Johnnydapunk

    As others are sharing their hockey memories one of mine from childhood is finding tickets to the All Star game that was played here (someone dropped them I guess as they were in an envelope with a business card) then hating that my mother said I have to call the number on the business card and return them as its the right thing to do, and then was given one of the tickets and apparently being mentioned on the radio by John Short (I actually only found that out maybe a month ago) . I don’t rememeber the score, but remember the seat where I was.

    I’m one of the few Im sure that has my mother to thank for a lot of hockey memories as my dad doesn’t really get hockey, and as my mother is Finnish, hockey is religion there like here. Even went to the Olympics in Calgary to watch Finland V Sweden (4-4 tie)

    I actually have loads of amazing Oiler and hockey memories and think it’s what keeps me from being overtly bitter about recent performances.

  • Canadian Hockey Fan

    Just testing the waters here but mikail grigorenko is a rfa and that means he can be given a offer-sheet so shouldnt a team consider moving a 3rd or even 2nd round pick to take a chance on a 21 year old big body prospect. While I would love to see the oilers do this because I feel with the new coaching and current roster we have young roster with talent that he could contribute to but all teams should be thinking about this. Even cash strapped teams might roll the dice and hope that a 2.2 mil dollar deal for 2/3 years nets them a top6 forward for 2 or more of those years, the kid is 21 and talented it is highly probable that if he plays his best hockey it will be starting in the next 3 years take a risk with a fringe nhl pick. If you tell me a 2nd is valuable I will point you to marco roy/musil/moroz and even lander who till last years breakthrough was looking at nothing but ceiling