10

Top 100 Oilers: Andy Moog (14)

For younger generations of Edmonton Oilers’ fans, say, those born after 1985 or so, their most vivid recollection of Andy Moog might be that he was playing goal for the Dallas Stars in 1997 when Todd Marchant scored the winning goal in overtime at Reunion Arena to complete a stunning upset in the first round of the playoffs. Top shelf, blocker side. That was Andy.

Moog, of course, owns a far bigger place in Edmonton’s franchise record books, a niche carved out more than a decade earlier that saw Moog’s name engraved on three Stanley Cups as a member of the Oilers. He was the underrated half of a dynamic crease tandem with Grant Fuhr during the early 1980s when the Boys on the Bus were just getting rolling. That was Andy, too.

Andy Moog

Goalie
Born Feb 18 1960 — Penticton, BC
Height 5.09 — Weight 170 [175 cm/77 kg]

Drafted by Edmonton Oilers

Round 7 #132 overall 1980 NHL Entry Draft

BY THE NUMBERS

Season

Age

Tm

GP

W

L

T/O

GA

SA

SV

SV%

GAA

SO

MIN

1980-81

20

EDM

7

3

3

0

20

3.83

0

313

1981-82

21

EDM

8

3

5

0

32

4.81

0

399

1982-83

22

EDM

50

33

8

7

167

3.54

1

2833

1983-84

23

EDM

38

27

8

1

139

1179

1040

.882

3.77

1

2212

1984-85

24

EDM

39

22

9

3

111

1050

939

.894

3.30

1

2019

1985-86

25

EDM

47

27

9

7

164

1480

1316

.889

3.69

1

2664

1986-87

26

EDM

46

28

11

3

144

1218

1074

.882

3.51

0

2461

1987-88

27

BOS

6

4

2

0

17

181

164

.906

2.83

1

360

1988-89

28

BOS

41

18

14

8

133

1079

946

.877

3.22

1

2482

1989-90

29

BOS

46

24

10

7

122

1145

1023

.893

2.89

3

2536

1990-91

30

BOS

51

25

13

9

136

1307

1171

.896

2.87

4

2844

1991-92

31

BOS

62

28

22

9

196

1727

1531

.887

3.23

1

3640

1992-93

32

BOS

55

37

14

3

168

1357

1189

.876

3.16

3

3194

1993-94

33

DAL

55

24

20

7

170

1604

1434

.894

3.27

2

3121

1994-95

34

DAL

31

10

12

7

72

846

774

.915

2.44

2

1770

1995-96

35

DAL

41

13

19

7

111

1106

995

.900

2.99

1

2228

1996-97

36

DAL

48

28

13

5

98

1121

1023

.913

2.15

3

2738

1997-98

37

MTL

42

18

17

5

97

1024

927

.905

2.49

3

2337

7 yrs EDM

235

143

53

21

777

4927

4369

.887

3.61

4

12901

6 yrs BOS

261

136

75

36

772

6796

6024

.886

3.08

13

15056

4 yrs DAL

175

75

64

26

451

4677

4226

.904

2.75

8

9857

1 yr MTL

42

18

17

5

97

1024

927

.905

2.49

3

2337

Career

713

372

209

88

2097

17424

15546

.892

3.13

28

40151

PLAYOFFS

Season

Age

Tm

GP

W

L

GA

SA

SV

SV%

GAA

SO

MIN

1980-81

20

EDM

9

5

4

32

3.65

0

526

1982-83

22

EDM

16

11

5

48

3.03

0

949

1983-84

23

EDM

7

4

0

12

110

98

.891

2.74

0

263

1984-85

24

EDM

2

0

0

0

3

3

1.000

0.00

0

20

1985-86

25

EDM

1

1

0

1

27

26

.963

1.00

0

60

1986-87

26

EDM

2

2

0

8

37

29

.784

4.00

0

120

1987-88

27

BOS

7

1

4

25

166

141

.849

4.24

0

354

1988-89

28

BOS

6

4

2

14

136

122

.897

2.34

0

359

1989-90

29

BOS

20

13

7

44

486

442

.909

2.21

2

1195

1990-91

30

BOS

19

10

9

60

569

509

.895

3.18

0

1133

1991-92

31

BOS

15

8

7

46

385

339

.881

3.19

1

866

1992-93

32

BOS

3

0

3

14

67

53

.791

5.22

0

161

1993-94

33

DAL

4

1

3

12

121

109

.901

2.93

0

246

1994-95

34

DAL

5

1

4

16

169

153

.905

3.47

0

277

1996-97

36

DAL

7

3

4

21

214

193

.902

2.81

0

449

1997-98

37

MTL

9

4

5

24

204

180

.882

3.04

1

474

Career

132

68

57

377

2694

2397

.890

3.04

4

7452

NOTABLE

Underrated? I think so. Moog, a seventh-round draft pick, 132nd overall, from the Billings Bighorns in 1980, was the goaltender who beat the Montreal Canadiens in a shocking three-game post-season sweep in 1981. He was the goaltender of record when the Oilers claimed their first Stanley Cup in 1984, beating the four-time champion New York Islanders in five games.

The underlying issue with the masked tag-team that was Fuhr and Moog was that Oilers had only one goal crease and two stoppers good enough to claim it on a nightly basis during the team’s rise to dynasty status. There was Moog, the longshot from the 1980 draft and Fuhr, the team’s first pick, eighth overall, from the Victoria Cougars a year later, 1981.

After leaning heavily on the journeymen like Ron Low and Eddie Mio in the crease early after Edmonton’s entry to the NHL in 1979, GM Glen Sather had a juggling act on his hands with Moog and Fuhr. Moog made his mark with the sweep of the Habs in 1981 and was the go-to guy in the second round, a six-game series loss to the Islanders. Fuhr got the net in the 1982 playoffs. In the 1983 post-season, Moog was again the guy as the Oilers went all the way to the Cup final, losing to the Islanders in seven games.

THE STORY

When Fuhr was injured in the third game of the 1984 Cup final, Moog locked down Edmonton’s first Cup parade. Back and forth they went tending the twine behind a star-studded line-up right through the 1987 playoffs. Fuhr was the No. 1 guy in Sather’s mind and that finally prompted Moog’s agent, Herb Pinder, to demand a trade as training camp for the 1987-88 season loomed.

Moog joined Team Canada leading up to the 1988 Olympics in Calgary. When the Olympics were over, Sather traded Moog to the Boston Bruins and got, all things considered, a handsome return – future Conn Smythe Trophy winner Bill Ranford, Geoff Courtnall and a second-round draft pick. While Moog never played more than 50 games during a regular season for the Oilers, he got the net in Boston, playing 51, 62 and 55 games 1990-93. Ranford and the Oilers beat Moog and the Bruins in the 1990 Cup final.

All told, Moog won 143 regular season games and 23 more in the playoffs with the Oilers on the way to three Cup wins during his tenure as Fuhr’s sidekick in Edmonton. Simply put, Moog was etched in Oilers folklore long before Marchant raced in alone on him late one night in the Lone Star State in 1997. Moog was a great goaltender who enjoyed his best days in Oiler silks.

This series will look at the top 100 Edmonton Oilers from the NHL era 1979-80 to 2014-15, starting with 100 and working up.

PREVIOUSLY:

  • Spaceman Spiff

    It’s funny, Robin. I grew up in northern Alberta during the dynasty years and I had completely forgotten about Andy Moog and this list until I opened up Oilers Nation this morning. My first thought was that 14 was a bit high, but then again, it isn’t really.
    In many ways, he’s the “forgotten” star among the 1980s Oilers. I don’t think we, as Oiler fans, necessarily understood how lucky we were to have two number-one goaltenders at the same time (“1 and 1A,” as Slats called them, I think). Like everything else in those glory years, it just felt normal. We had the five best forwards in the world, the best defenceman and two No. 1 goalies. We didn’t know anything different.

    One thing people of a certain vintage will remember is that, for a little while there, Moog was probably the more “popular” of the goalies among Oilers fans, for reasons that weren’t at all fair. For one, there was that infamous little spat Fuhr had with Oilers fans (one that was as much the fan’s fault and that he more than made up for). For another, technically, he was … perceived … as leaving his five-hole open a bit too much, which was almost a cardinal sin back then (I remember attending hockey school as a goalie and some of the instructors warning us not to open our five-holes like Fuhr did). Plus, as Canadians and Albertans, we have a peculiar habit of eating our own. Fuhr was from Spruce Grove and maybe we all felt we could cut him down a notch, if needed (funny thing: we never pulled that stunt with Messier). Like I say, none of it was fair.

    But none of that lasted very long, though. The 1/1A tandem lasted a long time but it was eventually going to reach critical mass. By the time 1987 rolled around, Moog’s displeasure over the situation was a fairly open secret and I remember that his decision to bolt for Canada’s national team was regarded as akin to a defection back then.

    That Moog would rather go and tour the world (and yes, play in the Calgary Olympics) with a bunch of AHL and Canadian university castoffs then play 30 games with the reigning Stanley Cup champions soured his relationship with the fandom here (Randy Gregg, who also did a tour with the national/Olympic team that year, was spared much of that ill-will – but then again, he also came back to the Oilers in time for the playoff run).

    When the Oilers faced Moog and the Bruins in the 1988 Cup final later that spring, it was obvious that both Oiler fans … and Moog himself … had gone their separate ways. And it was obvious that Moog didn’t leave Edmonton a happy man.
    The Oilers, of course, would end up haunting him a few times in his career. Two Cup finals, two losses. One monumental first-round upset in 1997.

    It was ironic that he’d retire with the Canadiens – the team he’d almost beat singlehandedly 17 years earlier, earning him a folk-hero status in Northern Alberta that eventually faded but, luckily, we haven’t forgotten.

  • Smuckers

    Moog was one of my favourite Oilers back in the day – glad to see him ranked so high in the top 100 Oilers. I do think his jersey should be retired one of these days.

  • Leef O'Golin

    Remember that old saying “If you have two #1 goalies, that means you don’t have any”? There’s an exception to every rule.

    His performance in that Habs playoff round alone guarantees him a special place in Oiler history. I remember Dick Irvin going on about how composed he was for such a young ‘tender.

  • I remember playing street hockey and each of us would pick an Oiler to be–often by the brand of stick you had in your hand that matched the player. For the goalies, it usually came down to whether you were a righty or lefty. Two of us were the rare righties, so we had to go with Fuhr, while others stuck with Moog. Moog’s win over the Habs was the mark of future greatness for the franchise (Gretzky specifically talks about it in his book). Great memories.