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Top 10 Who Got Away: Taylor Hall

From the moment the trade that sent Taylor Hall from the Edmonton Oilers to the New Jersey Devils for Adam Larsson was announced June 29, 2016, there wasn’t any doubt that Oilers’ GM Peter Chiarelli had made an over-payment in giving up what he did to get what he needed. The only question now, with the answer still to be determined, is how much of an overpayment the Hall-for-Larsson swap might turn out to be in five years or so. I’m leaning toward epic.

Hall, still only 26, is coming off a career-high 93-point season in his second year with the Devils. It’s a campaign that has Hall as a finalist for the Hart Memorial Trophy as league MVP. Despite a difficult 2017-18 season, Larsson has been what he came to Edmonton billed as — a hard-nosed, top-four D-man who bangs bodies, blocks shots and takes care of his own end first. Larsson has been the kind of blueliner the Oilers needed and Chiarelli was willing to pay a premium for. That said, when the premium is giving up a MVP candidate, as is the case here, I hope New Jersey GM Ray Shero at least bought Chiarelli a box of chocolates and sent him flowers.

Taylor Hall

Left Wing — shoots L
Born Nov 14th, 1991 — Calgary, ALTA
Height 6.01 — Weight 205 [185 cm/93 kg]

Drafted by Edmonton Oilers

Round 1 #1 overall 2010 NHL Entry Draft

BY THE NUMBERS

Season

Age

Tm

GP

G

A

PTS

+/-

PIM

S%

ATOI

Awards

2010-11

19

EDM

65

22

20

42

-9

27

11.8

18:13

Calder-9
2011-12

20

EDM

61

27

26

53

-3

36

13.0

18:13

2012-13

21

EDM

45

16

34

50

5

33

10.4

18:37

AS-3
2013-14

22

EDM

75

27

53

80

-15

44

10.8

20:01

AS-4
2014-15

23

EDM

53

14

24

38

-1

40

8.9

19:13

2015-16

24

EDM

82

26

39

65

-4

54

9.1

19:12

AS-8
2016-17

25

NJD

72

20

33

53

-9

32

8.4

19:20

2017-18

26

NJD

76

39

54

93

14

34

14.0

19:09

6 yrs EDM

381

132

196

328

-27

234

10.6

18:58

2 yrs NJD

148

59

87

146

5

66

11.4

19:14

Career

529

191

283

474

-22

300

10.9

19:03

PLAYOFFS

Season

Age

Tm

GP

G

A

PTS

+/-

PIM

S

S%

TOI

ATOI

2017-18

26

NJD

5

2

4

6

-1

6

21

9.5

103

20:38

Career

5

2

4

6

-1

6

21

9.5

103

20:38

WITH THE OILERS

Hall was a polarizing figure in Edmonton, to be sure. The two-time Memorial Cup MVP with the Windsor Spitfires was the best player the Oilers had every year he was here until Connor McDavid arrived, but the team never made the playoffs or came close to winning anything — aside from the NHL draft lottery. That wasn’t Hall’s fault, but it most certainly became his problem as the Decade of Darkness unfolded and frustrated fans vented and rightfully demanded results. Hall, Ryan Nugent-Hopkins and Jordan Eberle weren’t enough to get it done. Something had to change.

In many ways, Hall paid for the ineptitude of an organization that just couldn’t get things right and put the proper pieces together during his time here. How many “culture” changes did we see in that span? Some critics labelled Hall as a me-first guy. Others insisted he’d have a problem playing with McDavid — if not out on the ice then in the dressing room and on the marquee as second-banana. After one season of overlap with McDavid — Hall led the Oilers with 65 points while McDavid was limited to 45 games with a broken collarbone — Chiarelli made the move to get Larsson.

DOWN THE ROAD

Feb 27, 2017; Newark, NJ, USA; New Jersey Devils left wing Taylor Hall (9) reacts to being called for a tripping penalty during overtime against the Montreal Canadiens at Prudential Center. Mandatory Credit: Adam Hunger-USA TODAY Sports

Hall, you might recall, took the trade personally. “I think it’s safe to say I’m a very motivated player now,” Hall said the day the deal was announced. It seems Hall’s been pretty motivated this entire season after getting warmed up with 53 points in 72 games with the Devils in 2016-17. “I’m still very motivated,” Hall said this March during his 26-game point streak with his MVP season shaping up. “It’s more about, how can I help my team here? How can we get into the playoffs? That’s been my motivation, more so this year than last.”

Simply put, the Oilers created a huge hole on LW, one they still haven’t filled despite the lucrative contract they handed Milan Lucic, by trading Hall for Larsson. Hall is an MVP finalist who is in the prime of his career with, you’d think, several good seasons ahead of him. How would Hall look now with McDavid, or driving another line on his own for coach Todd McLellan, moving forward? That, we’ll never know. For now, Hall ranks No. 6 on this list, but I get the feeling that’ll change before very long.

This series of various Top 10 lists will focus on the post-1990 Oilers – the players who haven’t played on a Stanley Cup winner in Edmonton.

Previously in this Series:

    • champski

      Stopped listening to coaches. I would to if it was a new coach every year!! Dallas eakins!? Swarm..? Upper management has to be gutted or this team will go no where. Imagine 6million dollar Hall on Drasitle line. Instead we have 6 million dollar lucic on the 3rd line. BRUTAL.

      • Himynameistaylor

        champski, clearly you’ve never played hockey, lmfaooo.

        you stop respecting your coaches, you sit, you keep that behaviour up, you’re gone.

        It never matters if you have 6 coaches in a year, two, three or four, you respect the bench boss as that’s what he is- your boss.

    • dsanchez1973

      Nothing you say here is accurate. He said he didn’t want to have “dialogue” with coaches – that is more likely to mean that he wanted a consistent message to follow. As for Hall and McDavid together, I suggest you research just how much time was given to that experiment.

      • ubermiguel

        So he didn’t want to listen OR talk to the coaches, that’s much more mature. And nah, you research it and tell me how much time it was; I saw enough. Keeping them together hoping chemistry would develop was going to waste time and effort.

        • All Ice

          Why would you want them both on the same line? They’re both puck possession guys, better with it on their stick. Separate them and allow them to drive two lines. Cause having an offensive threat that isn’t McDavid might be nice right about now

        • Gravis82

          Why does Hall’s personality even matter? Despite having awful coaches and a bad attituide he was still lights out awesome during his time here considering the coaching carousel and awful support cast. When you look at his underlying metrics he is about a good in EDM as he was in NJ, just this year his PDO was very high.

          So you have an all star talent, world-class player, who despite bad coaches and immature attituide, is a great great player. And then you trade him just as he is maturing and about to get even better because, why again?

      • OilersGM

        @dsanchez1973
        Exactly.
        Hall never got much time with McDavid at all, I believe it was only 4 games and then they went to the world championship and lit it up together but no one recalls that.

    • OilersBro

      Hall actually did play well with McDavid. The only reason they got split up was because the rest of the team was so bad. Look at the CORSI/ Goals for stats when they were on the ice together. It was dominance

    • Rama Lama

      This was a quote that was taken out of context……..Hall went through many, many coaches, some beauties like Dallas Ekins …….would you listen to him??

  • Braindead

    Now way you heard it yourself Hall didn’t want to talk with the Coaches. First he was upset that the Oilers traded them but then contradicts himself that he didn’t want to talk with the coaches, yeah some top player.
    Chia should’ve waited until there was a market for Hall or until a better D was available to package a deal, exactly what Sakic did with Duchene.
    The only way to see if this trade works out is give it a couple seasons. It looked like Chia won the trade the first year when Oilers made playoffs but this year looks like a bust.

    • Fire Woodcroft!

      Hard to judge Larsson this year given some of the off-ice stuff his family went through.

      Not saying you’re wrong – just that calling it a bust doesn’t seem to look at the big picture. I’d just say that Hall’s play this year tipped the balance in his favour. Now we get to see if he repeats it next season…

  • Heschultzhescores

    So he was a motivated player “after” the trade. That’s all you need to know. The only tragedy is we didn’t get a bit more for him. He would not have the same success here as he is having with Jersey. There he is the man…here was a boy and might still be.

  • AlexTheOilersFanSince2006

    Okay, I’m getting sick and tired of people saying Edmonton “traded an MVP candidate”. Here’s a question. Was Taylor Hall a MVP Candidate AT THE TIME of the trade?

    Here’s my take. Hall had attitude problems, caused by the fact that he was never held accountable in this organization. He was gifted the keys to the city, held in high regard by EVERYONE and he let that fame and notoriety go to his head. And don’t say it doesn’t happen, look at Bieber. He admitted he never listened to coaches (and yes, that’s what he said) and even Klefbom and Scriven’s came out saying that Hall wasn’t always there when the team needed him. His skill set is undeniable and Chiarelli should’ve absolutely gotten more for a guy who’s one of the best LW in the game. But the trade had to happen. And I’m HAPPY that Larsson is on the team. He’s 10x the player that useless Justin Schultz was

    • AlexTheOilersFanSince2006

      Also, it should be noted that Edmonton’s offence hasn’t taken a hit from Hall’s departure. And no, I don’t care if it’s because we have McDavid going into God Mode. We’ve managed to score MORE goals WITHOUT Hall, then with him.

      • Marshall Law

        So you think that the team is in a better place offensively with Larsson on the team than Hall? Maybe you should be a little bit more concerned that this team can’t score when McDavid isn’t on the ice.

    • TKB2677

      I agree with you. I liked Hall a lot as a player. If it was possible, I would have liked him to still be an Oiler. But as you said, the Oilers did not trade away this Hall. They traded away the Hall that was in New Jersey the first year. He was still a good player but when they traded Hall and the Hall that played his first year in New Jersey was a really good, 60 pt winger who at the time did not buy into the team concept as much as he should, was not training like all the elite players and had not even come close to reaching his potential. There are articles written with direct quotes from him, there are interviews with his GM, his coach and Hall outlining that the coach and GM had a meeting at the end of his first year and told Hall he needed to change. I have no doubt in my mind that all the years that he was an Oiler, he probably had similar meetings with the Oilers staff on what he needed to work on to be a better player. The difference is Hall finally decided at the end of his first Devils season to finally DO IT. There is interviews and quotes from Hall himself outlining how he changed his mindset. How he decided to buy in more, to listen to the coaches, to take on more of a leadership role. He CHANGED where he lived in the offseason so he could train differently. Until last offseason, he was trained by his dad exclusively. Last offseason he started training with other elite players.

      Does it sting that Hall is up for the MVP this year? Yes it does. But it took being traded. It took another season of having the same results as he did in Edmonton. It took another GM and coach telling him he needed to change before he FINALLY CHANGED. Is there a chance that if he was still in Edmonton, maybe that changed would have still happened? Yes but it is very unlikely.

      • Glencontrolurstik

        Like I keep saying, that says a lot about the Oiler’s lack of “off-ice” coaching & life skill development. Hall was a multi-millionaire kid, with the keys to the city. With no one guiding him. Of course he would adopt a “me-first” attitude. His age and immaturity would dictate that, naturally. I would think the Devil’s would have addressed that first thing? To get him ready for the “New York” spotlight. He seemed to immediately grow-up as soon as he had all the Oiler pressure lifted. An off-ice coach would have showed him that that pressure was just perceived and non-existent. That makes any player instantly better.

    • Marshall Law

      Trade had to happen? Why? Whether he had attitude problems or not, they never affected his ability to produce.

      Also, while we’re revisiting the Schultz trade, Justin Schultz got Norris votes last year. I don’t recall Larsson being on that ballot.

      Schultz was a good player that was forced into a role he wasn’t read for with the Oilers. You could say that about almost every highly touted young player the Oilers have flushed over the past decade.

      • Glencontrolurstik

        Simple… It’s not an individual game, it’s a team game.
        It’s not about individual point production, it’s about a team’s point production. Case in point,… Las Vegas Golden Knight’s, Winnipeg Jet’s.
        No individual, run away point getters. Just 9 or 10 guys with a ton of points playing as a team.

        • Marshall Law

          Actually, there are a lot of individuals with really high point totals on both of those teams. A bunch of good individuals, when placed together, form a good team. Go figure.

    • Marshall Law

      Also, would it really have been that hard to believe at the time of the trade that a former first overall pick and point per game player in his early twenties would go on to be a Hart contender in the near future? I think we all knew that Hall’s ceiling was pretty damn high considering the numbers he posted in Edmonton on a terrible team for years.

  • Anton CP

    Well, guess we can at least congratulate Hall for his first ever trip to the Stanley Cup playoffs.

    I don’t think that he got away as much as the numbers indicated because he is playing against softer opponents with the Devils against mainly eastern teams. Hall used to have great numbers against eastern opponents so by actually play against them more often will lead to his breakout season (granted that Hall wasn’t very good last season but his C was Zajac and this season is Hischier). His 26 points streak was against 22 eastern teams and just 4 from west which started (2) and ended with western teams.

    Let’s put numbers in perspective: Metropolitan division has been scored on a total of 2026 times followed by Atlantic division with 2018 times and compare to Pacific division with 1907 times followed by Central division with 1601 times (with one less team but still unless that extra team can be letting in 300 goals [which is no one this season, not even the Isles with impressive 296 goals allowed]). It is a no surprise that the top 20 scorers in NHL that 14 from east and only 6 from west.

    Still, Hall is a great offensive player that I doubt any Oilers fans feel otherwise but I don’t think if he stayed with the Oilers that he will eclipse his 80 points season that much as he did this season. It was not an even trade by any means but Hall did not get away, he is just in the right place and right environment that certainly was not with the Oilers.

    • AlexTheOilersFanSince2006

      That’s actually a good point. During the DoD (especially 2010-2015), Edmonton always did well against Eastern Conference opposition as opposed to Western Conference opposition. Maybe Hall was built for that kind of competition.

  • Cambridge

    Adam Larsson has a plus/minus over the last two seasons of +31. No more than half a dozen defencemen in the NHL have better plus/minus records than that. And he has a $4M a year contract. Getting a player like that in a one for one trade is never going to be a bad deal.

  • lee

    Part of the reason I think Peter C traded Hall was because he saw it might be a problem now that McDavid was the man. Hall is the type of player and has the personality that he needs to be that man. In New Jersey, he is definitely the man.
    Still the return like the Rinehart fiasco shows just how week Peter C is when it comes to trading players.
    If the Oiler’s really want to be a top team, not sure how that happens with Peter C steering the bus.

  • GK1980

    Man I miss Hall, he should have been an oiler for life. Doesn’t seem right he plays for Devils.

    Larsson is a good D but not in the same class as Hall. Dang.

  • OilersBro

    Taylor Hall is like that ex who does well for themselves after the relationship. Yes, you’re happy for them and wish them all the best. It’s just that you wish you were doing a bit better than them.

  • Burnward

    Imagine expecting a kid drafted into the worst run organization in hockey, subjected to losing year after year (basically due to a team not trying to win), surrounding by a clown car of coaches and then complaining HE wasn’t professional enough as a 24 year old.

  • smiliegirl15

    The trade forced Hall to grow up and realize he needed to be a team player. I don’t miss him one bit. Although he’s realized he needs to be a team player, he’s still a me first guy. I would argue Nuge seems to be filling that left wing hole much better. Lucic will have a bounce back season (hopefully).
    The one I miss more is Eberle.

  • Spaceman Spiff

    Another great piece, Robin. Can’t argue with the player, but maybe he should be higher on the list. Hall’s a great player and, as you say, he’s just entering his prime. It stings that he is a Hart Trophy finalist, and the Oilers haven’t/can’t/won’t replace him on LW.

    But, really, it only stings a little. And there are a few reasons for that.

    One, the Oilers made the playoffs without him last year. Yes, I know … that’s largely due to McDavid’s MVP year, a great year from Talbot, and a bunch of players who came out of the woodwork. And this year, everyone took a step back (except for McD) but a year ago at this time, it looked like the Oilers traded Taylor Hall for a Swedish version of Jason Smith.

    Two, the “confession.” To me, everything about the Hall Trade changed when he admitted in an interview with a reporter in New Jersey, earlier this year, that he really didn’t “talk” to coaches or engage with them while he was in Edmonton and that his biggest change in New Jersey is that he’s finally started seeing the value in talking or engaging with coaches there. Next thing you know, he’s an MVP candidate.

    I realize there are probably several ways to interpret (or misinterpret) his admission. Was he just saying that he kept his mouth shut and played? Maybe. It’s hard to argue with his personal statistics, even when the team was so bad. Like the Great Canadian Philosopher Don Cherry said, it’s hard to soar like an eagle when you’re surrounded by turkeys. But Hall soared, even when the team, collectively, couldn’t get off the ground.

    But maybe there’s more to it. Was he couching his language a bit by saying he didn’t “talk” to coaches in Edmonton when, in reality, he wasn’t listening to them? That’s my thought, anyway. And if it’s true, it’s an absolutely huge admission, because not listening to your coaches is a cardinal sin for young players in the NHL and it’s not recommended for established stars/older players, either.

    For me, Hall’s confession it completely changed the narrative on that trade, overnight.

    Think about it. In June 2016, the Oilers were in desperate, five-alarm-fire need of a right-shooting defenceman. The preference was for an offensive guy who could run a power play, but at that point, the Oilers probably weren’t fussy. I remember saying this about 10 years ago and it was true in June 2016 (and is probably still true now), their entire blueline corps needed an upgrade on every type of defenceman – shooters, puck-movers, stay-at-home guys – everyone. Chiarelli and McLellan would have seen that in the fall of 2015. They just had to figure out which of the Big Three they were going to have to move to get a decent defenceman.

    By the end of the season, they found their guy. They had a 24-year-old star player who wouldn’t engage with coaches. Excellent individual talent, daring, river-pusher, the whole nine yards. But he wasn’t particularly great on the defensive side of the game, iffy on the PK. An early-season experiment at centre was a disaster. And … yeah … six seasons in the league and nowhere near the playoffs.

    Side note: I don’t care about any of the off-ice rumours around town. I don’t care if they were true or not. They’re not relevant, mainly because the Oilers of the 1980s were far more, ahem, colourful for their antics around town back in the day (They were lucky there wasn’t social media or camera-phones back then). Hall’s life away from the ice is/was none of our business and it didn’t affect his game. At all. Full stop.

    A funny thing happened on the trade market. Hallsy wasn’t nearly as valuable as they (or the fandom) thought he was. Everyone thought they could get PK Subban for him, straight up. But the market spoke. Ironically, Subban was moved the same day as Hall went, but they weren’t in the same deal. And I bet Montreal’s kicking themselves for not making that deal now (seriously – how is that not a bigger story?).

    But I’m still not sure if the Oilers should be kicking themselves for the deal they made that day. Yeah, he’s definitely one that got away … but this season, I think he finally recognized why he was sent away.

    • Marshall Law

      A lot of good points, but I would argue that it wasn’t a question of Hall’s trade value. Chiarelli has a history of getting locked in on a player and paying any price to obtain him (see Lucic, Russell, Reinhardt and, of course, Larsson). Other GMs came out after the trade and said they didn’t even know Hall was available. Chiarelli gets tunnel vision, which hurts even more when you consider that he’s such a terrible negotiator.

    • TKB2677

      Good Post. I think part of the problem that Oilers fans have is they WAY overvalue the players that wore the jersey. Hall was a good player, no debating that but I believe is reputation and value around the league was WAY lower than what Oilers fans at the time thought. Hall was supposedly one of the best left wingers in the league YET he didn’t get all star nods as an Oiler, he never played on any big Team Canada events in fact he never got even invited to their camps. Going to the World Championships where most Canadian players can’t be bothered doesn’t count. If you are regarded as one of the BEST players in the league at your position, how are you not even invited to the camps for Team Canada Olympic teams or World Cup teams. It doesn’t add up. I know Canada has a ton of depth but everyone in Edmonton believed he was one of THE BEST in the league at your position and would find stats to back it up. If that is actually the case, Team Canada would find away to have you on the team.

      So when it came time to make the trade. The value of Hall wasn’t what most Oilers fans thought. But worst of all, the value of the other pieces like a Nuge or Eberle, players that most Oilers fans would have preferred to go first over Hall, weren’t even close to what Hall was worth.

      So I believe they probably started trying to trade one of Nuge or Eberle and it was either flat out NO’s or it would take one of those 2 plus 2 or 3 more pieces. OR you could trade Hall 1 for 1 to get Larsson who is is a good dman, ticks off lots of the boxes they needed but not all of them. So I am guessing they decided it was better to lose 1 piece to get a pretty good dman rather than 3 or 4 pieces to get the same type of guy. There was a rumor out there that the Oilers were after Subban who ultimately got traded for Weber straight up. Now that is turning out to be a bad trade but at the time Weber was a lock on every Team Canada, a legit #1 and a guy in the norris conversation most years. No disrespect to Hall but Hall at that time wasn’t even CLOSE to the same level of Weber and that is what it took to get Subban. The rumored asked from the Habs for Subban was Drai (makes sense, they still need a center, not another winger in Hall), the 3rd overall (Puljujarvi) and Nurse for Subban. So if that traded was true and it happened, you created 3 holes to get 1 guy. You traded a #1 center on just about every team, at worst a 3-4 Dman in Nurse AND at worse a top 9 winger, most likely a top 6 guy in Puljujarvi for Subban who’s a really good dman but not that good to be worth that.

      • Marshall Law

        You’ll remember that Team Canada was run by the same knuckleheads that currently run the Oilers. The fact that they didn’t the same dopes that traded Hall didn’t select him for Olympic teams shouldn’t shock the pants off of anyone.

    • fasteddy

      My theory is there actually was a Hall/Subban deal in the works…Chia lost the game of chicken and panicked grabbing the next best thing he had going. Kind of a “ok fine I’ll trade him elsewhere if you won’t meet our price”, followed by a “oh yeah, I can do that too”….

  • Marshall Law

    A lot of ridiculous comments on here. It was a horrible trade the day it was made. It looks even worse today.

    He had attitude issues because he wouldn’t listen to his coaches? Looking at the results of the team over those years, I can’t help but think he was the sole voice of reason in that scenario. In any event, it didn’t affect him on the ice, so I do not care if he didn’t want to shoot the breeze with Dallas Eakins after practice. By all accounts, Hynes is an incredible coach that the Devils players love to play for. Maybe the Oilers should find one of those before they cycle through a few more generations of talent.

    The Chia defenders keep trying to say Hall wasn’t good as an Oiler. This guy already had a year where he finished in the league’s top 10 in scoring, so his results this year shouldn’t shock anyone. He’s a star player. Full stop. In fact, this year wasn’t even his best 5 on 5 season. It was just his most productive powerplay season. I can’t imagine how fans still defend this front office after seeing player after player leave and perform well elsewhere. Cheer for your team, but don’t do so with your head in the sand.

    Larsson is fine. He’s a steady, stay-at-home d man who can’t make an outlet pass to save his life, but he has value. I feel bad that he’ll be tied to Hall forever, because this trade was a tire fire from the start. There’s a reason the Oilers were ridiculed by anyone and everyone at the time, and there’s a reason they’re still being ridiculed today.

    • Fire Woodcroft!

      Don’t think anyone on here is actually defending Chiarelli. What I’m seeing is folks saying that the trade wasn’t the doomsday scenario that some suggest.

      First up return for Hall shouldn’t have just been Larsson. There should have been at least a pick or a prospect coming the other way as part of a package. To that extent the trade was a bad one.

      However if you are suggesting that Edmonton didn’t have to improve their defence somehow then you’re willfully blind. Our D was bad. Historically bad. Something had to change there and while adding Larsson didn’t check all the boxes he certainly helped improve the situation.

      From reports the choice was to go Hall for Larsson or give Montreal what they were asking for for Subban. Given those options I’d take the NJ trade any day of the week.

      My bet is that those GM mouth-breathers who are leaking stories about not knowing Hall was available probably didn’t have a solid and young defensemen along the lines that the Oilers were looking for.

        • gr8haluschak

          Like who, which d man/men were they signing that was improving this team (let alone as much as Larson did) – a 37 year old garbage Brian Campbell, Dan Hamhuis yay a bottom 6 guy, Demers – another middle paring at 5 million. And they did sink 4 million into Russel that year as well but do not let that fact get in your way. god you people are stupid

          • Anton CP

            So, you were saying that the fans should tolerate another few bad years before some top tier D-man became available? Instead of DoD that you are saying the Oilers and Chiarelli should make it DYoD?

      • Anton CP

        Chiarelli should get more out of the deal that is absolutely true, he didn’t so he was making the trade quite terrible. Chiarelli is likely a really bad poker player considering that anyone that calls his bluff that he just quickly fold.

        Otherwise, like you said, most (if not all) are not here to defend Chiarelli but you can also see the lack of rationality from the Oilers fans on this site. Different team, different teammates, different opponents, different environment, heck, even different type of fans. How often do you think a hockey player in Jersey will encounter a fan run into them on the street and tell them “you suck” compare to Edmonton? We even have some idiot hassle McDavid here, we may have more knowledgeable hockey fans here but at the same time that we also have way more hockey idiots and trolls here too. Just look at the comment section post game should give you some ideas…

  • CMG30

    Too bad we didn’t have Hall to trade for Karlsson now. That’s a one for one that would have been worth it. I’m not saying that Larsson is a bad defense man, far from it, I like him. But that doesn’t mean that trade was a good one.

  • Himynameistaylor

    Adam Larsson’s draft comparable was a “more physical Nicklas Lidstrom”

    He has an untapped offensive upside, dude has a wicked shot from the blueline he just hasn’t been on a team that has had high end offensive forwards and here in Edmonton, he hasn’t had PP time.

    Defencemen take time to develop, and typically don’t hit their peak til they’re 26+. Larsson best forward was Zajac in NJ and Joakim Lindstrom who’s best offensive year was 60 points in Larsson’s draft year.

    Then he goes to NJ who at the time is known for their 1-3-1 system and low scoring games.

    He’ll show up soon, unlike Hall, who’s only playing well because there’s no ranch bar stars for him to objectify.

    All Hall did was give men everywhere in Edmonton an example on how not to treat women.