TOP 100 OILERS: BORIS MIRONOV (57)

I’ve written about the misadventures of Boris Mironov as a member of the Edmonton Oilers a time or two, so I’m not going get too much into specifics again. You can read some of it here. What I will say, though, is it’s too bad Mironov wore out his welcome in Edmonton because he was a helluva player and a guy who everybody in the dressing room loved.

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It wasn’t really surprising, then, that when the Oiler contingent rolled into Chicago in November of 1999 for their first game against the Blackhawks since GM Glen Sather had traded him the previous March, boozing Bobo was waiting on us in the lobby of the Ritz-Carlton. Same big smile. Same big handshake. A new big contract from the Blackhawks. He was happy to see us. We were happy to see him. That was Boris.

Boris Mironov

Defense

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Born Mar 21 1972 — Moscow, Russia 


Height 6.03 — Weight 220 [191 cm/100 kg]

Drafted by Winnipeg Jets


Round 2 #27 overall 1992 NHL Entry Draft

BY THE NUMBERS

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Season

Age

Tm

GP

G

A

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PTS

+/-

PIM

S

S%

ATOI

1993-94

21

TOT

79

7

24

31

-33

110

145

4.8

1993-94

21

WIN

65

7

22

29

-29

96

122

5.7

1993-94

21

EDM

14

0

2

2

-4

14

23

0.0

1994-95

22

EDM

29

1

7

8

-9

40

48

2.1

1995-96

23

EDM

78

8

24

32

-23

101

158

5.1

1996-97

24

EDM

55

6

26

32

2

85

147

4.1

1997-98

25

EDM

81

16

30

46

-8

100

203

7.9

1998-99

26

TOT

75

11

38

49

13

131

173

6.4

25:39

1998-99

26

EDM

63

11

29

40

6

104

138

8.0

25:55

1998-99

26

CHI

12

0

9

9

7

27

35

0.0

24:17

1999-00

27

CHI

58

9

28

37

-3

72

144

6.3

24:53

2000-01

28

CHI

66

5

17

22

-14

42

143

3.5

22:05

2001-02

29

CHI

64

4

14

18

15

68

129

3.1

22:43

2002-03

30

TOT

56

6

10

16

2

56

70

8.6

20:05

2002-03

30

CHI

20

3

1

4

-1

22

14

21.4

19:12

2002-03

30

NYR

36

3

9

12

3

34

56

5.4

20:35

2003-04

31

NYR

75

3

13

16

1

86

129

2.3

20:37

6 yrs

EDM

320

42

118

160

-36

444

717

5.9

25:55

5 yrs

CHI

220

21

69

90

4

231

465

4.5

22:52

2 yrs

NYR

111

6

22

28

4

120

185

3.2

20:37

1 yr

WIN

65

7

22

29

-29

96

122

5.7

Career

716

76

231

307

-57

891

1489

5.1

22:43

PLAYOFFS:

Season

Age

Tm

GP

G

A

PTS

+/-

PIM

S

S%

TOI

ATOI

1996-97

24

EDM

12

2

8

10

-6

16

31

6.5

1997-98

25

EDM

12

3

3

6

-3

27

26

11.5

2001-02

29

CHI

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

6

5:41

Career

25

5

11

16

-9

45

57

8.8

6

5:41

NOTABLE

The occasionally AWOL and always popular Mironov had played 320 regular season games and 24 more in the playoffs for the Oilers when Sather shipped him, Dean McAmmond and prospect Jonas Elofsson to Chicago for Chad Kilger, Daniel Cleary, Ethan Moreau and Christian Laflamme on March 20, 1999.

The trade most certainly re-shaped the Oilers on Edmonton’s end. For Mironov, the move meant a new deal with Chicago and a raise from the $1.2 million he’d earned in Edmonton to a salary of $3.1 million as part of a four-year contract worth $12.9 million. Part of the move, as always, was about money with all eyes in Edmonton on the bottom line.

Part of it was Sather was dealing from a position of depth – he also had Roman Hamrlik, Janne Niinimaa and a young Tom Poti on the blue line. In that regard, it made some sense as a hockey move. Kilger, Cleary and Moreau were all first-rounders who hadn’t yet panned out. Still, in Mironov, the Oilers sent away a guy who could hit, shoot the puck, produce points and always volunteered as social director and head of sight-seeing.

THE STORY

Mironov twice hit 40 points with the Oilers, including 46 in 1997-98. He had 40 with the Oilers the next season at the time the trade was made. Mironov wouldn’t match those numbers with the Blackhawks or with the New York Rangers, his final NHL stop. Mironov was just 31 in his final season with the Rangers. Then, after 716 games, he was done.

I often wondered how good Mironov might have been had he taken his career more seriously – had he put in the work during the off-season, occasionally made curfew on the road. He had a boatload of talent, but he was pretty much indifferent on the dedication end of things. Even so, Mironov lead Edmonton D-men in scoring for four straight seasons.

In the end, Mironov was here for a good time, not a long time. That was true in Winnipeg, where he began his too-brief NHL career, Edmonton, Chicago and New York. The life of the party, out looking for Kovy, was Bobo. That’s who he was and the way he chose to go. 

This series will look at the top 100 Edmonton Oilers from the NHL era 1979-80 to 2014-15, starting with 100 and working up. 


Listen to Robin Brownlee Wednesdays and Thursdays from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on the Jason Gregor Show on TSN 1260.

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  • Oilers G- Nations Poet Laureate

    Bobo was a good soldier. He could snipe, or throw up a grenade.
    Whenever I saw him play live, I created a new stat on my programs score sheet( yes, those were a thing)…Bobo’s Flashes of Brilliance, and Bobo’s Window Licking Moments….
    It was too bad that he usually had Windex on his breath.

  • Easily one of my all time favourite personalities on the Oilers. I’d love to know what he’s up to now.

    The Kovy story is understandably the one I always see talked about, but the story I always recall is him hitting (I think) Jason Arnott in the face with one of his crazy slap shots during practice. Already under scrutiny by the team for putting his own forwards in danger with his high & wide howitzers, Bobo immediately drops to the ice and starts doing push-ups.

    Google couldn’t help me out with the details so my recollection might be off, but always was the story that summed him up for me.

    Brownlee – did this happen or am I making it up?

  • FISTO Siltanen

    I’m glad you touched on his deal out of here RB.

    The kids can see Oilers-small-market logic 90s style.

    $2.5M or so was deemed to expensive for one quality player who enjoyed playing here so the Oilers shipped him out for 4 bit parts (yes Moreau was a key player and Cleary eventually found a role in the NHL) whose total salaries equalled about….$2.5M. Then proceeded to bury one of them in the minors, another in the press box and a third who was no better than a bottom pairing defence man. Plus another very good 3rd/4th line player.

    Very shrewd move.

  • Morgo_82

    As much as I liked Mironov and McAmmond, I actually didn’t mind the deal at the time. Kilger could’ve been way more but he was another one of these incredibly lazy players with a boatload of talent combined with a huge shot. Cleary had lots of talent as well, just wasn’t a fit here and took forever to find his game. Moreau has more or less been basically the same player his whole career which aside from the incredibly dumb and poorly timed penalties was a really good third line / penalty killer for his time here. Laflamme, well I honestly don’t know what happened with him because he looked like he was just about to breakout as an offensive defenseman but he fell off the face of the earth instead.

  • Butters

    Loved it when Rod Philips called a goal by BO BO Mirioov. Very animated, but usually followed a few plays later with Rod wondering aloud what BO BO was thinking on one of his colossal gaffes.