RE-LIVE THE EDMONTON OILERS 1984-85 SEASON

85Oilers

After putting the brakes on the juggernaut that was the New York Islanders and parading the 1984 Stanley Cup up and down Jasper Avenue, the only encore that would do for the 1984-85 Edmonton Oilers was to follow that up by keeping another date with the engraver.

Sure, another 100-plus-point season, Edmonton’s fourth in a row, was nice. So was another campaign in which Wayne Gretzky, Mark Messier, Glenn Anderson and the Oilers would again score at least 400 goals – 401 to be exact. A record 15-game unbeaten streak (12-0-3) to start the season served notice the Oilers were ready to rumble again.

Fine. Good. But one Stanley Cup does not a dynasty make – unless you live down the road in Calgary – so “repeat” was the rallying cry for NHL season six inside and outside Northlands Coliseum as Glen Sather’s young Oilers and their fans strutted into the 1984-85 campaign in lock-step and kept on marching until that second Cup came home to Edmonton.  

RECORD 49-20-11 109 Pts. – 2nd Overall

GD 401-298 plus-103 SH% 15.5 SV% .887

NOTABLE TRANSACTIONS

1985-04-14

Pat Conacher signed as free agent by New Jersey.

1985-03-05

Tom Gorence signed as free agent by New Jersey.

1985-02-21

Marco Baron signed as free agent (formerly with Los Angeles).

1985-02-06

Dave Lumley claimed on waivers from Hartford.

1985-02-01

Craig MacTavish signed as free agent (formerly with Boston).

1985-01-24

Terry Martin traded to Minnesota with Gord Sherven for Mark Napier.

1984-10-09

Billy Carroll claimed on waivers from NY Islanders.

1984-10-09

Dave Lumley claimed on waviers by Hartford.

1984-10-09

Terry Martin claimed on waivers from Toronto.

1984-06-21

Mike Krushelnyski traded by Boston for Ken Linseman.

1984-06-09

Selmar Odelein drafted 21st overall.

1984-06-09

Daryl Reaugh drafted 42nd overall.

LEADING SCORERS

Scoring

Player

Pos

Age

GP

G

A

PTS

+/-

PIM

S

S%

Wayne Gretzky

C

24

80

73

135

208

98

52

358

20.4

Jari Kurri

RW

24

73

71

64

135

76

30

261

27.2

Paul Coffey

D

23

80

37

84

121

55

97

284

13.0

Mike Krushelnyski

LW

24

80

43

45

88

56

60

187

23.0

Glenn Anderson

RW

24

80

42

39

81

24

69

258

16.3

Mark Messier

C

24

55

23

31

54

8

57

136

16.9

Charlie Huddy

D

25

80

7

44

51

50

46

146

4.8

Dave Hunter

LW

27

80

17

19

36

-1

122

119

14.3

Mark Napier

C

28

33

9

26

35

12

19

50

18.0

Willy Lindstrom

LW

33

80

12

20

32

5

18

98

12.2

Goalie Stats

Player

Age

GP 

W

L

T/O 

GA

SA

SV

SV% 

GAA 

SO 

MIN

Grant Fuhr

22

46

26

8

7

165

1426

1261

.884

3.87

1

2559

Andy Moog

24

39

22

9

3

111

1050

939

.894

3.30

1

2019

Mike Zanier

22

3

1

1

1

12

100

88

.880

3.89

0

185

Marco Baron

25

1

0

1

0

2

9

7

.778

3.64

0

33

Daryl Reaugh

19

1

0

1

0

5

35

30

.857

5.00

0

60

Team Total

80

49 

20 

11

295 

2620 

2325 

.887

3.64

2

4856 

SEASON RECAP

CupRing

With the ring and the bling to go with the swagger they were already well-known for, the Oilers had supplanted the four-time champion Islanders as the big dogs on the NHL block and they, like every Cup winner, had every opponent waiting on them with something to prove. It didn’t matter.

The Oilers ripped off that 15-game unbeaten streak – it started with a 2-2 tie against the Los Angeles Kings and ran through an 8-5 win over Washington – before they finally lost, 7-5 on Nov. 11 to the Philadelphia Flyers, the team they would end up facing in the Stanley Cup final.

In between that first meeting with the Flyers, the Oilers would put together a pair of eight-game winning streaks and another of four to surpass 100 points for the fourth straight season. Gretzky hit the 200-point mark, with 208, for the third time. The Oilers won the Clarence Campbell Conference with 109 points, while the Flyers were Prince of Wales champs with 113.  

MAKE IT TWO TIMES

OilersCup

Gretzky, already the greatest player in the game, put his stamp on the 1985 post-season like nobody ever has, scoring a record 47 points (17-30-47) in just 18 games on the way to his first Conn Smythe Trophy. Not that he needed much help, he got plenty from Paul Coffey, who had 37 points, and Grant Fuhr, who went 15-3-0 as the goaltender of record in every game.

Los Angeles hung in against the Oilers in the opening round despite being swept 3-0, as overtime goals by Lee Fogolin and Anderson were the difference. The Winnipeg Jets fell in four straight in the second round before the Oilers prevailed 4-2 over the Chicago Blackhawks to advance against the Bullies in the Cup final. 

After the Flyers won the first game of the final, 4-1 at the Spectrum in Philadelphia, the Oilers turned it on and they never looked back. After 3-1, 4-3 and 5-3 wins to go up 3-1 and set the stage, Gretzky and the Oilers completed the repeat with an exclamation mark, pounding the Flyers 8-3 to ignite a second straight Stanley Cup celebration. Encore complete.

Listen to Robin Brownlee Wednesdays and Thursdays from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on the Jason Gregor Show on TSN 1260.

RECENTLY BY ROBIN BROWNLEE  

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  • Oilers G- Nations Poet Laureate

    Aaahhhhh memories.

    Thanks Robin. This series brings me back to a time when we Oil fans were “spoiled”.

    Gretzky, Kurri, Messier, Anderson….those were good times.

    Hall, Nuge, Ebs, Connor*….I see good times ahead.

    * I am NOT comparing todays Young Guns to those greats.

  • D

    After the Oilers lost Game 1 to the Flyers, Esa Tikkanen got placed in the lineup in Game 2 with Sather hoping to shake things up a bit. It worked. This was Tikkanen’s first game in the NHL, as he had no regular season appearances in the 84-85 season.

  • Spaceman Spiff

    Great piece, Robin. Lots of memories coming back, including some lesser ones.

    Not sure if the rest of you caught it in the photo of the Stanley Cup presentation, but notice the CTV television logo in the bottom right corner.

    One side-memory I have about that final was that it wasn’t broadcast on CBC Hockey Night in Canada. For some reason, CTV got rights to the final that year and, for many of us kids, it was the first time we got to hear Dan Kelly call a game.

    Kelly is and was, for my money, the best play-by-play man I’ve ever heard. Better than Foster Hewitt, better than Bob Cole, better than Cuthbert, better than Danny Gallivan.

    Kelly died many years ago and was primarily the voice of the St. Louis Blues. He did great work in that 1985 final, but it paled in comparison to his legendary calls two years later during Canada Cup 1987.

  • Canoe Ride 27.1

    When you’re thirteen and you watch Andy step inside the blue line and blow one past Hextall to ice your second straight cup, you’re kind of hooked for life.

    I feel glory coming back, 2-3 years. Buckle up.