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Nation Network 2018 NHL Draft Rankings: No. 90-81

The fine folks at CanucksArmy have put together their annual NHL draft rankings. Over the next month, we’ll be bringing to you their top-100 projection for the upcoming draft. Click the links on each player’s name for a more detailed profile.

No. 90: Jerry Turkulainen

“Turkulainen has a quick shot that allows him to beat goalies before they can get set. It isn’t strong and is likely part of the reason why he relies on deking, deception, and passing to create offence.

One knock of his games entering his first year of eligibility was his defensive game – but he has made improvements there this past year. He uses his skills to his advantage and rather than trying to overpower his opponents, he will adjust his attack points and hound the player with the puck.  It shows a maturity to his game and an understanding of what his deficiencies are. Those things are on display in a few of the goals, as he just relentless on the puck when he doesn’t have it.” – Ryan Beich

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2016-17  JYP Liiga 48 9 17 26 6 14 | Playoffs 8 1 0 1 4 0
 JYP-Akatemia Mestis 8 0 5 5 0 2 |
 Finland U20 (all) International-Jr 7 3 2 5 4 0 |
2017-18  JYP Liiga 52 10 23 33 18 18 | Playoffs 6 0 3 3 4 -1
 Finland U20 (all) International-Jr 9 2 2 4 0 |
2018-19  JYP Liiga

No. 89: Emil Westerlund

“Overall, there were some suggestions that he was worth a late round flyer last season and his play this year in the NCAA shouldn’t change that. He’ll always have a low ceiling in the professional ranks, so it just really depends what an organization values what he brings. If I was running a draft table, I would swing for the fences on other players but if Westerlund does, in fact, get selected, it shouldn’t be a shock.” – Ryan Beich

2015-16  Linköping HC J18 J18 Elit 2 2 0 2 0 0 |
 Linköping HC J18 J18 Allsvenskan 9 5 5 10 2 4 | Playoffs 5 2 2 4 2 2
 Linköping HC J20 SuperElit 38 7 9 16 20 2 | Playoffs 3 0 0 0 0 0
 Sweden U18 (all) International-Jr 4 1 0 1 0 -1 |
2016-17  Linköping HC J20 SuperElit 44 28 11 39 22 7 | Playoffs 2 1 0 1 0 1
 Sweden U19 (all) International-Jr 4 3 0 3 4 1 |
2017-18  Univ. of Maine NCAA 34 7 6 13 18 3 |
 Sweden U20 (all) International-Jr 3 0 0 0 2 -1

No. 88: Vladislav Kotkov

“The Moskva native has a heavy shot when given to time and space to lean into it and is able to move the puck well to his teammates. There are some concerns that he doesn’t process the game quickly but his read of the play is not a weakness, he just isn’t always quick to react.

He isn’t terrible in his own zone and uses his long reach to break up lanes and keep the pressure on the opponent carrying the puck. Kotkov can lose his mark though if facing a player who is particularly quick at accelerating or strong on their edges.” – Ryan Beich

2016-17  CSKA Moskva U17 Russia U17 18 10 16 26 12 |
 CSKA Moskva U19 Moskva U19 5 5 3 8 2 |
 Krasnaya Armiya Moskva MHL 19 1 2 3 4 -3 | Playoffs 1 0 0 0 0 0
 Russia U17 WHC-17 6 0 0 0 0 |
2017-18  Chicoutimi Saguenéens QMJHL 61 21 28 49 20 -5 | Playoffs 6 0 2 2 2 -2
 Russia U18 (all) International-Jr 5 0 2 2 6

No. 87: Carl Wassenius

“Obviously scouting the SuperElit can be a tricky venture and that is reinforced by the fact that there are limited scouting reports on Wassenius.

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He has the size already to be an effective player but isn’t quick but he can get going when given space to have full strides. Wassenius is strong on the puck but displays some soft hands with stickhandling and passing.  His shot isn’t particularly strong and will need to be something that is improved. The Swedish pivot is good at slipping into gaps in coverage and then using his puck skills to his advantage.” – Ryan Beich

2016-17  AIK J18 J18 Elit 21 26 36 62 14 31 |
 AIK J18 J18 Allsvenskan 18 16 23 39 20 2 | Playoffs 3 1 7 8 2 1
 AIK J20 SuperElit 6 3 2 5 2 1 |
 AIK Allsvenskan 1 0 0 0 0 0 |
2017-18  Örebro HK J20 SuperElit 34 16 24 40 47 -5 | Playoffs 7 4 8 12 2 4
 Enköpings SK  Division 1 1 0 0 0 0 -1

No. 86: Jay O’Brien

“I like his ability to generate offence without being a slouch in the defensive zone. He uses his speed, agility and ability to process the game to his advantage in his own zone. O’Brien does the little things well and has the motor to make things happen when afforded the opportunity.

As mentioned off the top, there is always a risk in taking a USHS player early in the draft but O’Brien chose that route so that he was academically eligible for Providence. He opted to not go to the USHL for more games to ensure that he could make that he could head to the NCAA next season.” – Ryan Beich

2016-17  Thayer Academy USHS-Prep 30 24 41 65 |
 Cape Cod Whalers U18 MHSL U18 13 13 9 22 12 |
 Cape Cod Whalers U18 Midget 22 18 10 28 |
 Youngstown Phantoms USHL 4 0 1 1 4 -1 |
2017-18  Thayer Academy USHS-Prep 30 43 37 80 |
 Cape Cod Whalers U18 MHSL U18 8 6 2 8 |
 U.S. National U18 Team USDP 7 1 1 2 4 |
 Youngstown Phantoms USHL 1 0 0 0 0 0 |
2018-19  Providence College NCAA

No. 85: Ty Emberson

“Emberson was a defender that slid into more of a depth role for the USNDTP as other players passed him on the depth chart as the season went on. He has a skillset that is intriguing as his comfortable with the puck, willing to rush with it or pass it off to his teammate with speed.  He has decent size and speed and uses both effectively in the defensive zone to limit opponents chances.

The Eau Claire native isn’t a flashy player by any means but does enjoy to join the rush when the opportunity presents itself. But he feels more like a calming influence on the ice and isn’t forcing things to happen. It shows some maturity to his game that he can recognize chances to make things happen but won’t force anything.” – Ryan Beich

2016-17  USNTDP Juniors USHL 34 0 8 8 12 -18 |
 U.S. National U17 Team USDP 56 0 18 18 14 |
 U.S. National U18 Team USDP 1 0 0 0 0 |
 USA U17 WHC-17 5 0 3 3 0 |
2017-18  USNTDP Juniors USHL 25 4 11 15 0 12 |
 U.S. National U18 Team USDP 61 4 23 27 46 |
 USA U18 “A” WJC-18 7 0 4 4 12 5 |
2018-19  Univ. of Wisconsin NCAA

No. 84: Jakub Skarek

“Skarek is bigger of the two Czech goalies and as Greg mentions, he uses his size to advantage to ensure that he is more conservative in the net and not allowing himself to get into positions where he trying to recover. But does recognize when he can attack a shooter on a breakaway or odd man chance. He does a good job of looking above and around traffic to locate the puck. It’s easy to say he is ‘technical’ and uses his athleticism to his advantages and requires a little further explanation.  For the most part, Skarek is very controlled and tight with his butterfly and then push offs to adjust his angle. He does a good job to keep his glove over his pad and eliminate the gap there.” – Ryan Beich

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2016-17  HC Dukla Jihlava U20 Czech U20 1 1.00 .950 |
 HC Dukla Jihlava Czech2 28 2.11 .925 | Playoffs 5 1.96 .916
 HC Dukla Jihlava Czech Q 0 | Qualification 2 1.88 .932
 HC Sparta Praha  Czech 4 1.47 .946 |
 Czech Republic U18 WJC-18 4 5.29 .853 |
 Czech Republic U18 (all) International-Jr 11 2.91 .899 |
 Czech Republic U20 WJC-20 3 3.34 .884 |
 Czech Republic U20 (all) International-Jr 5 3.18 .898 |
2017-18  HC Dukla Jihlava Czech 21 2.41 .913 | Relegation 2 3.60 .857
 HC Dukla Jihlava Czech Q | Qualification 3 2.59 .894
 HC Stadion Litomerice  Czech2 10 1.90 .942 |
 Czech Republic U19 (all) International-Jr 6 3.65 .865 |
 Czech Republic U20 WJC-20 5 5.19 .848 |
 Czech Republic U20 (all) International-Jr 7 5.28 .801 |
2018-19  Pelicans Liiga

No. 83: Scott Perunovich

“The landscape of the NHL is certainly changing, and defencemen under six feet have been able to have all sorts of success provided that they excel in the right areas. Over the past couple of seasons, Perunovich has evolved from “undersized defenceman” to “small but dynamic puck-moving defenceman” – that’s the kind that NHL teams have warmed up to.

Perunovich is a good skater, both quick and agile, and has the slipperiness factor that allows him to elude heavier players around the ice. His greatest assets are his vision and puck skills, which he uses to great effect both breaking out of his zone and setting up offensive chances at the other end. He demonstrates patience with the puck, waiting out defenders rather than piling shots into their shin pads, or else moving it deftly around the attacking zone. As a result, his shot rate isn’t as high as it potentially could be, but it’s an adjustment that has led to offensive opportunities nonetheless.” – Ryan Beich

2016-17  Cedar Rapids RoughRiders USHL 56 6 15 21 14 -37 |
2017-18  Univ. of Minnesota-Duluth NCAA 42 11 25 36 36 22 |
 USA U20 WJC-20 7 1 2 3 2 2

No. 82: Jachym Kondelik

“When watching Kondelik, the most obvious thing that stands out about his game is his size. That size manifests in his skating as he has a very long stride and thus doesn’t appear to be working hard to generate his speed, reminding me of Cal Foote with the Kelowna Rockets, as it doesn’t look like they skate well but they get the speed they need from a few strides. There have been some concerns that he can’t keep up with the play because of his slower and strong side – that he might get left behind by quicker forwards. This is something that he will need to work on to succeed at the next level with a focus on the technical side of skating.” – Ryan Beich

2015-16  HC Ceske Budejovice U18 Czech U18 44 23 46 69 53 3 |
 Czech Republic U17 WHC-17 5 0 1 1 2 |
 Czech Republic U17 (all) International-Jr 17 1 3 4 6 0 |
2016-17  Muskegon Lumberjacks USHL 43 7 8 15 6 5 |
 Czech Republic U18 WJC-18 5 1 5 6 8 3 |
 Czech Republic U18 (all) International-Jr 15 3 8 11 12 1 |
2017-18  Muskegon Lumberjacks USHL 44 16 18 34 43 -2

No. 81: Linus Karlsson

“I think Karlsson is a really good roll of the dice in later rounds – obviously, we have him ranked as the 81st best prospect but he will likely slide further as indicated by the consolidated ranking of 129th. When entering those later rounds, a player like Karlsson should be who to target. He has produced at every level up until now, he tore up his junior league while making everyone better and held his own in the SHL. He will likely be given a larger role with Karlskrona next season as they were relegated to the Allsvenskan for the 2018-19 season. The drafting team will retain his rights for four years and thus allow him to round out his game in the Allsvenskan for a little longer than a CHL player.” – Ryan Beich

2016-17  Boro/Vetlanda J18 J18 Div.1 3 5 5 10 6 | Relegation 4 5 5 10 4
 Boro/Vetlanda J20 J20 Div.1 3 2 4 6 27 |
 Boro/Vetlanda Division 2 31 21 23 44 32 |
2017-18  Karlskrona HK J20 SuperElit 42 27 25 52 26 11 | Playoffs 6 2 2 4 10 1
 Karlskrona HK SHL 13 0 1 1 2 -3 | Relegation 1 0 0 0 2 0
 Sweden U19 (all) International-Jr 4 2 4 6 0 5 |
2018-19  Karlskrona HK Allsvenskan